Paw-some! Owning a dog may cut risk of children getting eczema, study suggests trends now

Paw-some! Owning a dog may cut risk of children getting eczema, study suggests trends now
Paw-some! Owning a dog may cut risk of children getting eczema, study suggests trends now

Paw-some! Owning a dog may cut risk of children getting eczema, study suggests trends now

Paw-some! Owning a dog may cut risk of children getting eczema, study suggests US researchers tracked eczema rates in 789 children whose parents had a dog  Being exposed to a dog has a 'significant protective effect' against eczema They said dogs' diverse bacteria could help children's immune development

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Owning a dog might help your future children — by slashing their risk of eczema, research suggests.

US experts tracked eczema rates in almost 800 children under the age of two and looked at whether their parents kept a dog indoors during pregnancy or in the first year they were born.

Being exposed to a dog appeared to have a 'significant protective effect' against developing eczema in children, they claimed.

Researchers from Henry Ford Health in Detroit, Michigan, found being exposed to a dog in early childhood has a 'significant protective effect' against developing eczema in under-twos

Researchers from Henry Ford Health in Detroit, Michigan, found being exposed to a dog in early childhood has a 'significant protective effect' against developing eczema in under-twos

WHAT IS ECZEMA?

Eczema is an inflammatory condition of the skin that leads to redness, blistering, oozing, scaling and thickening.

It usually appears in the first few months of life and affects around 10 per cent of babies.

Eczema's cause is not fully understood but it is thought to be brought on by the skin's barrier to the outside world not working properly, which allows irritants and allergy-inducing substances to enter.

It may be genetic due to the condition often running in families.

As well as their skin being affected, sufferers may experience insomnia and irritability.

Many factors can make eczema worse. These may include:

Heat, dust, soap and detergents Being unwell, such as having a cold Infections Dry skin Stress

There is no cure for eczema, however, 70 per cent of childhood sufferers no longer have the condition in their teens.

Patients should avoid known triggers for flare ups and use emollients.

Source: British Skin Foundation 

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The team from Henry Ford Health in Detroit, Michigan, said dogs' diverse bacteria could help children's immune development, staving off the condition.

Eczema, which affects up to one in five children and one in 10 adults, is an inflammatory condition that causes the skin to become itchy, dry and cracked.

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