Patients with Type 2 diabetes are at double the risk of dying from cancer, ... trends now

Patients with Type 2 diabetes are at double the risk of dying from cancer, ... trends now
Patients with Type 2 diabetes are at double the risk of dying from cancer, ... trends now

Patients with Type 2 diabetes are at double the risk of dying from cancer, ... trends now

Having type 2 diabetes makes death from certain cancers more than twice as likely, a major study has found.

Those diagnosed with bowel, liver, pancreatic and endometrial cancer have double the risk of dying if they are diabetic, according to British researchers.

Younger women with type 2 diabetes – often linked to obesity – were also found to be at heightened risk of death if they developed breast cancer.

The findings suggest cancer may have overtaken heart attack and stroke as a leading cause of death in people with type 2 diabetes.

Younger women with type 2 diabetes – often linked to obesity – were also found to be at heightened risk of death if they developed breast cancer (stock pic)

Younger women with type 2 diabetes – often linked to obesity – were also found to be at heightened risk of death if they developed breast cancer (stock pic)

Experts believe prolonged exposure to the effects of increased blood sugar and insulin levels, insulin resistance and chronic inflammation can cause some cancers and potentially make others more deadly.

They warned deaths could spiral unless more is done to tackle the obesity epidemic and urged officials to consider additional cancer screening programmes to target those most at risk. The study used the UK general practice database to access information on more than 135,000 Britons, aged 35 and over, who were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between 1998 and 2018.

While overall cancer death rates fell in under 75s, those linked to type 2 diabetes bucked the trend by rising over the past two decades.

Pancreatic, liver and lung cancer death rates increased at all ages while bowel cancer saw rises in most age groups, researchers found.

Meanwhile, breast cancer rates increased in younger women – classed as under 55 – and prostate and endometrial cancer rates rose in those aged 75 and over.

Dr Suping Ling, who led the

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