Doctors warn you can get ADDICTED to running trends now

Doctors warn you can get ADDICTED to running trends now
Doctors warn you can get ADDICTED to running trends now

Doctors warn you can get ADDICTED to running trends now

Doctors warn you can get ADDICTED to running - especially if you only jog to forget your problems Around one in four casual runners show signs of being addicted, experts say  The new Norwegian study shows the type of people who may be most at risk 

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Joggers who pound the streets to run away from their problems could be at risk from exercise addiction.

Around one in four casual runners show signs of being addicted - giving up time with loved ones to go running instead, and feeling withdrawal symptoms when they cannot run.

Now a study shows the type of people who may be most at risk.

Around one in four casual runners show signs of being addicted - giving up time with loved ones to go running instead, and feeling withdrawal symptoms when they cannot run

Around one in four casual runners show signs of being addicted - giving up time with loved ones to go running instead, and feeling withdrawal symptoms when they cannot run

The research, involving 227 recreational runners, found the strongest link with exercise addiction for those who used running to block out negative thoughts.

People who used running to improve their lives were less likely to become addicted.

Both these types of people saw running as escapism, but researchers stress that attitude is important.

Dr Frode Stenseng, who led the study from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, said: 'People who can't help but use running to run away from their problems will find it is bad for them.

'They will be less in control of their running if they use it as a coping strategy, so may become addicted and even feel ashamed and depressed after going for a run.'

The study, published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology, surveyed runners on their wellbeing, symptoms of exercise addiction and escapist attitude towards jogging.

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