'Useless' vitamin spray, an 'anti-bacterial' dish sponge and 'plant-based' ... trends now

'Useless' vitamin spray, an 'anti-bacterial' dish sponge and 'plant-based' ... trends now
'Useless' vitamin spray, an 'anti-bacterial' dish sponge and 'plant-based' ... trends now

'Useless' vitamin spray, an 'anti-bacterial' dish sponge and 'plant-based' ... trends now

Goop, the wellness brand founded by Gwenyth Paltrow, sent home its summit attendees with bags full of freebies worth more than than $2,000, but experts claim the products aren't worth the high price tag and could be 'useless.'

Last month, the brand hosted its annual In Goop Health wellness summit at the company's headquarters in Santa Monica, California - an event that cost $1,200 for one-day access and up to $4,000 for a 'weekender pass.' 

At the close of the summit, which included an 'Ask Me Anything' session with the founder herself, Goop sent the 130 participants home with goody bags filled with supplements, pubic hair oil, an anti-aging serum worth hundreds of dollars and biodegradable doggy bags. 

All-in, the swag bag is estimated to be worth more than $2,200. 

However, despite their high price tag, experts told DailyMail.com most of the products aren't worth it

As part of the take-home haul, a vitamin spray promises up to three times the daily recommended intake of vitamin C, a blend of essential oils claims to 'soften and condition' pubic hair, and a plant-based lubricant costs twice as much as alternatives.

But dietitians and doctors called the products 'useless' and warned of undesirable side effects. 

At her wellness retreat earlier last month, actress and influencer Gwenyth Paltrow gave away gift bags worth more $2,200

At her wellness retreat earlier last month, actress and influencer Gwenyth Paltrow gave away gift bags worth more $2,200

A two-ounce vitamin C and zinc spray, Zinc Up spray, made by online supplement retailer nbpure, claims it provides 'daily immune support that packs a punch' with its 50 milligrams of Vitamin C and 5 milligrams of zinc in each five-spray serving.

Labeling on the bottle, which goes for $17, indicates people can do five sprays three to five times a day, totaling up to 250 milligrams of vitamin C and 25 milligrams of zinc. 

This is more than three times the recommended serving size of 75 milligrams of vitamin C and over twice the recommended amount of zinc, which is eight milligrams for women and 11 milligrams for men.

However, supplements and products like the vitamin spray are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), so there is no way to determine how much - or what - is in the product. 

Vitamin C is a crucial nutrient the body needs to form blood vessels, cartilage, muscle, and collagen. It also helps protect cells against illness and support immune health. 

Though rare, consuming too much of it could lead to digestive symptoms like diarrhea and nausea.

The adult daily limit for zinc - which supports immune health and metabolism - is 40 milligrams, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Getting too much can lead to nausea, dizziness, headaches, upset stomach, vomiting, and loss of appetite. 

Dr Carolyn Williams, registered dietitian in Alabama and co-host of the Happy Eating podcast, told DailyMail.com while vitamin C is crucial for supporting immune health, most Americans get enough of it through their diets. 

'Even if you don't eat the best diet, vitamin C is a pretty easy [nutrient] to get,' she said. 'It's always best if you can get it from food.' 

Zinc Up vitamin C and zinc spray claims to provide 50 milligrams of vitamin C and five milligrams of zinc per serving and can be taken up to five times a day. This puts consumers up to five times over the recommended daily limit for both nutrients

Zinc Up vitamin C and zinc spray claims to provide 50 milligrams of vitamin C and five milligrams of zinc per serving and can be taken up to five times a day. This puts consumers up to five times over the recommended daily limit for both nutrients

Gynecologists have warned women to steer clear of putting fragrances near their vaginas because it could lead to irritation and yeast infections

Gynecologists have warned women to steer clear of putting fragrances near their vaginas because it could lead to irritation and yeast infections

According to the NIH, one medium orange has 78 percent of the daily value of vitamin C. One-half cup of sweet red pepper has 106 percent, and one-half cup of broccoli has 57 percent. 

An orange or head of broccoli typically costs about $1, whereas the spray runs

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