Why DID our loved ones have to die? Heartbreaking accounts of bereaved Covid ... trends now

Why DID our loved ones have to die? Heartbreaking accounts of bereaved Covid ... trends now
Why DID our loved ones have to die? Heartbreaking accounts of bereaved Covid ... trends now

Why DID our loved ones have to die? Heartbreaking accounts of bereaved Covid ... trends now

Michelle Rumball says her 78-year-old mother Violet was left to die because of a PPE shortage, with medics placing a DNR on her to avoid becoming infected.

Kathryn Butcher believes her sister-in-law would still be alive today had ministers locked down the country sooner in March 2020.

Alan Inglis says his son Callum died 'without dignity' after he became infected in prison and was left to cough up blood without receiving any medical care.

These are just three of the most heartbreaking stories of Brits who've lost loved ones to Covid. 

Here, MailOnline tells them in full, including the tales behind the four protesters who held up signs that read 'The Dead can't hear your apologies' as Boris Johnson began giving evidence to the Covid inquiry today.  

Dozens more people who have lost family and friends to Covid gathered outside the inquiry, with many holding pictures of loved ones

My mother's life was needlessly taken away

Kirsten Hackman lost her mother, Margaret Watt, during the first wave of Covid in 2020.

Ms Watt was admitted to the Isle of Wight NHS Trust after falling and fracturing her pelvis. 

She tested negative when hospitalised but, four weeks later and still in hospital, she tested positive for the virus.

Just 48 hours later, she was placed on the hospice ward and she died on May 2 — just two weeks before her 86th birthday.

Ms Hackman said she was able to see her mother in hospital before she died 

She told The Guardian: 'Her life was needlessly taken away from us, and the most vulnerable in our community have been badly let down by preventable actions.' 

Only eight people could attend her funeral, which is 'not what she would have wanted', she added.

My mother wasn't resuscitated due to a PPE shortage 

Ms Rumball's mother Violet Partington, 78, was rushed to Northwick Hospital in Harrow, north west London, on April 8, 2020, due to breathing difficulties.

The grandmother-of-13 died hours later.

A few days after her death, her family discovered that a do not attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation (DNAR) order had been imposed on Ms Partington.

Ms Rumball told the i that her mother, and other elderly Covid patients, had been 'written off'.

NHS staff claimed that Ms Partington signed the order before medical notes revealed there was no signature, she told The Mirror

She claimed that the hospital blamed a shortage of PPE that meant it was 'reasonable' for a doctor to sign the DNAR order 'to minimise risk and avoid depleting PPE stocks'.

She told the paper that she hopes the inquiry 'will get some sort of justice for my mum'. 

My husband died alone in an unnatural environment 

Fran Hall's husband Steve died from Covid on October 18, 2020, just three weeks after they got married and one day before his 66th birthday.

Steve, a retired Metropolitan police sergeant, was suffering from terminal prostate cancer but his health took a rapid downturn in the days following the wedding.

He was taken to hospital in an ambulance eight days after they got married. 

She told London funeral website Poppy's: 'In the period before he died, we were totally separated, I couldn't be with him. 

'I know that for the last days of his life he was alone in an unnatural environment, with no touch, surrounded by people with their faces covered. 

'That's not how human beings should be.'

Ms Hall was able to be with Steve when he died but said 'so many others were denied that'.

A billboard truck takes part in a protest against the scale of the Covid deaths in Britain outside the Covid Inquiry in London ahead of Boris Johnson giving evidence

A billboard truck takes part in a protest against the scale of the Covid deaths in Britain outside the Covid Inquiry in London ahead of Boris Johnson giving evidence

She joined the Covid-19 Bereaved Families for Justice Campaign and spent 10 days working on the memorial wall alongside the River Thames. 

Ms Hall was invited to Downing Street, along with other campaigners, to meet Mr Johnson and share her story but said she could see 'no flicker of compassion or hurt' behind his eyes, she wrote in The Guardian.

Late Covid lockdown might have killed my sister-in-law 

Ms Butcher's sister-in-law Myrna Saunders, 56, died in March 2020.

She told The Guardian: 'Today is probably the hardest [day] for me so far because of the [first] late lockdown.

'Had it come when it should have come there's a chance [Myrna] would not have caught Covid. That was Johnson's decision. 

'I think today is going to be emotionally hard. I want to know the truth. I want to make sure my family is protected from this happening again.'

My father was treated like toxic waste

Anna-Louise Marsh-Rees, who leads Covid Bereaved Families for Justice Cymru, today called for 'accountability, not weak apologies' over Government decision-making. 

She said: 'My father Ian died of hospital acquired Covid on the 23rd of October 2020. Even if they make excuses for what happened in wave one, there was all that time for prepare for wave two and in-between that crucial period.

'While most of the decisions shaping the response in Wales were made by the Welsh Government, there were many decisions made by UK Government that shaped the response in Wales too.'

Ms Marsh-Rees previously told the inquiry that Ian, 85, died 'gasping for breath' after catching Covid and that his body was treated like 'toxic waste'.

Her father was admitted to a hospital in Abergavenny with

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