Exercise might NOT make you live longer: Fascinating study debunks age-old ... trends now

Exercise might NOT make you live longer: Fascinating study debunks age-old ... trends now
Exercise might NOT make you live longer: Fascinating study debunks age-old ... trends now

Exercise might NOT make you live longer: Fascinating study debunks age-old ... trends now

Scientists in Finland have suggested that being too active won't prolong life Results showed that those who were active were around a tenth less likely to die

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For decades, we have been told that exercising as much as possible is crucial for avoiding an early grave.

But now academics in Finland have challenged the age-old logic after finding that being too active doesn't necessarily prolong life. 

Experts at the University of Jyvaskyla examined the exercise habits and biological age of thousands of participants.

Results revealed how the most active adults were least likely to die over the course of the 45-year study. 

However, the link faded heavily when lifestyle factors, such as smoking and alcohol, were factored in.

It means that, in theory, people who exercise more may only live longer because they follow a healthy diet, get plenty of sleep and are social as opposed to how much time they spend in the gym.

In fact, being among the top workout fanatics could actually fuel biological ageing by nearly two years, results suggest. 

Scientists in Finland have suggested that being too active won't prolong life. Researchers examined the exercise habits and biological age of thousands of participants.

Scientists in Finland have suggested that being too active won't prolong life. Researchers examined the exercise habits and biological age of thousands of participants.

Earlier studies suggest exercise is linked with slowing down this internal process.

Researchers examined more than 11,000 pairs of twins, aged 18 to 50 at the start of the study, who were monitored from 1975 to 2020.

They completed questionnaires on their physical activity levels, which categorised them as sedentary (13.4 per cent), moderately active (36.7 per cent), active (38.7 per cent) or highly active (11.2 per cent). 

The researchers did not share how long people had to spend exercising to fall into each category.

The team also took blood samples to track biological ageing — the rate at which a person is ageing physically.

To calculate their biological age, the researchers examined alterations in DNA, which reflect factors that influence lifespan, such as genes, eating habits and exercise.

Results show that those who were moderately active, active or highly

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