Health chiefs STILL don't know how elderly Brit caught swine flu in freak ... trends now

Health chiefs STILL don't know how elderly Brit caught swine flu in freak ... trends now
Health chiefs STILL don't know how elderly Brit caught swine flu in freak ... trends now

Health chiefs STILL don't know how elderly Brit caught swine flu in freak ... trends now

Health officials today admitted they still have no idea how an elderly Brit caught a strain of swine flu never seen here before.

The unidentified patient, now known to be aged over 75 and from North Yorkshire, had a 'mild' illness and recovered fully at home. 

The disease was only caught by fluke when they were randomly tested by their GP, sparking fears that the H1N2 virus was spreading under the radar.

UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) bosses have yet to spot any more cases amid their scramble to contain a potential outbreak.

But they confessed 'some limited degree' of human-to-human transmission 'may have occurred'. 

The unidentified patient, now known to be aged over 75 and from North Yorkshire, had a 'mild' illness and recovered fully at home. The disease was only caught by fluke when they were randomly tested by their GP, sparking fears that the H1N2 virus was spreading under the radar

The unidentified patient, now known to be aged over 75 and from North Yorkshire, had a 'mild' illness and recovered fully at home. The disease was only caught by fluke when they were randomly tested by their GP, sparking fears that the H1N2 virus was spreading under the radar

Symptoms of swine flu ¿ which sparked a pandemic that raced around the world in 2009 ¿ mirror those of regular flu and Covid. But it doesn't spread easily between humans. Most cases occur among people exposed to infected pigs, such as any visitors of country fairs and farmers. Swine flu cases surge in pigs in autumn and winter

Symptoms of swine flu — which sparked a pandemic that raced around the world in 2009 — mirror those of regular flu and Covid. But it doesn't spread easily between humans. Most cases occur among people exposed to infected pigs, such as any visitors of country fairs and farmers. Swine flu cases surge in pigs in autumn and winter

Officials revealed that one household contact and one other contact of the patient 'were symptomatic'. 

But their symptoms had already resolved by the time they were identified and they were not tested while unwell. 

The infected Brit visited their GP on November 9 and received their lab result two weeks later on November 23.  

The UKHSA is still undertaking 'rapid work' to identify how the virus was acquired. 

The Brit did not work with pigs and 'no direct contact' between the patient and 'any animal' was reported.

'The presence of a symptomatic household contact, means that some limited degree of human-to-human transmission may have occurred,' they said.

Meera Chand, incident director at UKHSA,

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