NHS crisis saw more than 1.5million A&E patients have to wait at least 12 hours ... trends now

NHS crisis saw more than 1.5million A&E patients have to wait at least 12 hours ... trends now
NHS crisis saw more than 1.5million A&E patients have to wait at least 12 hours ... trends now

NHS crisis saw more than 1.5million A&E patients have to wait at least 12 hours ... trends now

ONE-and-a-half million patients waited more than 12 hours after arriving at A&E in England in the past year, figures reveal.

For the first time, data has been published showing the time spent in an emergency department before being admitted, transferred or discharged.

These figures are separate from the regularly published ‘trolley wait’ figures, which only measure the time taken after a decision to admit a patient was made.

And they show that - at some NHS trusts - as many as one in four patients are facing delays of 12 hours of more after arriving at the emergency department.

The Liberal Democrats, who carried out the analysis, said their findings reveal the half-a-day delays have ‘almost become the norm’.

As many as one in four patients are facing delays of 12 hours of more after arriving at the emergency department (stock image)

As many as one in four patients are facing delays of 12 hours of more after arriving at the emergency department (stock image)

The latest figures show that in total 1,540,945 patients faced waits of 12 hours or more after arriving at A&E between February 2023, when the new data was first published, to January 2024.

This equates to almost one in 10 patients during that period, five times higher than the NHS requirement that no more than 2 per cent of patients should wait 12 hours or more from their time of arrival at A&E.

It means around 4,200 patients waited more than 12 hours at A&E every day over the past year.

January saw the worst figures yet as winter pressures struck, with a record 177,805 or one in eight patients facing A&E waits of over 12 hours.

Ambulance data shows that response times slumped in September. Despite the number of category two callers (yellow line) — such as burns, epilepsy and strokes — remaining static, 999 crews took 37 minutes and 28 seconds to arrive on the scene (red bars). This is six minutes slower than August and twice as long as the 18 minute target

Ambulance data shows that response times slumped in September. Despite the number of category two callers (yellow line) — such as burns, epilepsy and strokes — remaining static, 999 crews took 37 minutes and 28 seconds to arrive on the scene (red bars). This is six minutes slower than August and twice as long as the 18 minute target 

At Blackpool Teaching Hospitals, over one in four patients in January faced

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