Doctors insisted my baby was fine... so why did I have a stillbirth just two ... trends now

Doctors insisted my baby was fine... so why did I have a stillbirth just two ... trends now
Doctors insisted my baby was fine... so why did I have a stillbirth just two ... trends now

Doctors insisted my baby was fine... so why did I have a stillbirth just two ... trends now

A mother has told of her heartbreak after her baby was delivered stillborn, just two days after medics dismissed her concerns and sent her home.

Madison Goodwin, from Southend in Essex, was 36-weeks pregnant when she attended Southend University Hospital in January for a scan amid concerns over her baby's growth.

The 18-year-old was told she needed an emergency C-section after results revealed she was 'at risk' and her baby was too small.

However, as she sat in the waiting room, medics told her she had been mixed up with another patient that had the same name and due date. 

A second scan later that day showed her baby was kicking normally. 

Ms Goodwin was sent home and asked to return two days later for another scan. However, at that appointment, she was told her baby had no heartbeat. 

Madison Goodwin (pictured), from Southend in Essex, was 36-weeks pregnant when she attended Southend University Hospital on January 11 for a scan over concerns over her baby's growth

Madison Goodwin (pictured), from Southend in Essex, was 36-weeks pregnant when she attended Southend University Hospital on January 11 for a scan over concerns over her baby's growth

After results revealed she was 'at risk' and her baby was too small, she was immediately told she needed an emergency c-section. But as she sat in the waiting room, medics then told her she had been mixed up with another patient with the same name and due date. A second scan later that day showed her baby was kicking normally. Pictured, Ms Goodwin with her partner Matteo Furiello

After results revealed she was 'at risk' and her baby was too small, she was immediately told she needed an emergency c-section. But as she sat in the waiting room, medics then told her she had been mixed up with another patient with the same name and due date. A second scan later that day showed her baby was kicking normally. Pictured, Ms Goodwin with her partner Matteo Furiello

The 18-year-old was sent home and asked to return two days later for another scan. On January 13, however, she was told there was no heartbeat. Ms Goodwin was induced and her daughter, Valentina, was stillborn. Pictured, Ms Goodwin with Valentina

The 18-year-old was sent home and asked to return two days later for another scan. On January 13, however, she was told there was no heartbeat. Ms Goodwin was induced and her daughter, Valentina, was stillborn. Pictured, Ms Goodwin with Valentina

Ms Goodwin was induced and her daughter, Valentina, was stillborn. 

She said: 'I'm still quite numb and in shock — it happened so quickly as she was here and then all of a sudden she wasn't.'

Her mother Dawn, who said her daughter was continually 'fobbed off', has now called for a 'thorough investigation into Southend Hospital'.

Mid and South Essex NHS Foundation Trust, said they had begun a 'full investigation' into the events and were in 'close contact' with the family. 

Stillbirths — when a baby is born dead after six months of being in the womb – occur in around one per 200 births in England.

WHAT IS STILLBIRTH? 

A stillbirth is when a baby is born dead after 24 completed weeks of pregnancy. 

It happens in around one in every 200 births in England.

If the baby dies before 24 completed weeks, it's known as a miscarriage or late foetal loss.

The NHS advises mothers to contact their midwife or doctor straightaway if they are worried about their baby, such as if it is moving less than usual.

Expectant mothers should not wait until the next day, as reduced movement can be a sign something is wrong and needs to be checked, the health service said.

Some stillbirths happen due to complications with the placenta, a birth defect or the mother's heart.

But in some cases no cause can be identified.

If a baby has died in the womb, mothers may be able to give birth naturally or may have to be induced.

Not all stillbirths can be prevented, but not smoking, avoiding alcohol and drugs during pregnancy and not sleeping on your back after 28 weeks can reduce the risk. 

Source: NHS

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In the early stages of pregnancy, Ms Goodwin suffered from violent sickness and was admitted into hospital with dehydration.

After frequently returning to the maternity unit, she was told she may have kidney stones and later a water infection.

'She wasn't well and nobody seemed to have

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