Diet that mimics the effect of fasting WITHOUT starving yourself could add ... trends now

Diet that mimics the effect of fasting WITHOUT starving yourself could add ... trends now
Diet that mimics the effect of fasting WITHOUT starving yourself could add ... trends now

Diet that mimics the effect of fasting WITHOUT starving yourself could add ... trends now

A diet that mimics the effect of fasting without starving yourself can extend your life by years, a study suggests.

Researchers found that people who followed the fasting-mimicking diet (FMD) for 15 days reduced their biological age by over two years on average.

Tests also showed they had a lower risk of diabetes, heart disease and stroke, based on biomarkers in their blood.

The FMD diet involves eating around fewer than 1,000 calories - made up of low-fat foods, soups, energy drinks and supplements.

It is said to trick the body into thinking it is fasting, releasing enzymes and other chemicals in the body that have been linked to longevity.

Participants ate a FMD made up of plant-based soups, energy bars, energy drinks, chip snacks, and tea portioned out for five days, as well as a supplement providing high levels of minerals, vitamins, and essential fatty acids

Participants ate a FMD made up of plant-based soups, energy bars, energy drinks, chip snacks, and tea portioned out for five days, as well as a supplement providing high levels of minerals, vitamins, and essential fatty acids

Professor Valter Longo, a biologist from the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, who developed the diet in the new study and is the lead author, said: 'This is the first study to show that a food-based intervention that does not require chronic dietary or other lifestyle changes can make people biologically younger.'

The diet used in the study involved three cycles of five days on the FMD diet.

Day one saw the participants eat 1,100 calories, while days two to five saw them consume eat around 720 calories daily.

Their diet during these days also consisted of healthy chip snacks and tea.

The diet is made up of 34 percent carbohydrates, 10 percent protein and 56 percent fat for the first day, and then seven percent carbohydrates, nine percent protein, and 44 percent fat for

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