Parents who lose a baby before 24 weeks of pregnancy can now get a 'baby loss ... trends now

Parents who lose a baby before 24 weeks of pregnancy can now get a 'baby loss ... trends now
Parents who lose a baby before 24 weeks of pregnancy can now get a 'baby loss ... trends now

Parents who lose a baby before 24 weeks of pregnancy can now get a 'baby loss ... trends now

Parents who lose a baby before 24 weeks of pregnancy can today apply for a certificate to have their grief formally recognised for the first time. 

The scheme will be voluntary and ministers say it will remain the choice of all parents to manage their bereavement 'however they see fit'.

Babies born before 24 weeks do not need to be officially registered, leaving some mums and dads feeling ignored.

The new certificates can be requested online for free from 9am and will be available to either parent who has suffered a loss in early pregnancy since September 2018.

They will be official but not legal documents.

The Government will issue voluntary baby loss certificates to support parents who have experienced a loss of pregnancy before 24 weeks

The Government will issue voluntary baby loss certificates to support parents who have experienced a loss of pregnancy before 24 weeks

Ministers are considering plans to extend the eligibility criteria for a certificate and whether bereaved parents should receive statutory leave from work.

The certificate idea was formed as part of the Government's response to the independent Pregnancy Loss Review.

The government says it is 'committed to ensuring bereaved parents feel supported through their grief and recognise their loss, acknowledging their pain and ensuring they feel heard'.

On a visit to a family bereavement centre at a maternity unit, Maria Caulfield, Minister for the Women's Health Strategy, said parents who lose a baby before 24 weeks can feel there is a 'lack of recognition of that baby'.

Speaking at St George's Hospital in Tooting, south-west London, she said: 'Getting an official certificate means a lot.

'Parents feel it's so important to see their baby's name on a certificate that they can share with family, and friends and remember that baby.

'We've had parents user-testing the system which is why it's taken a little bit longer to get up and running than we would have liked.

'It's a very difficult time for parents, even if they don't do it straight away… so we want to make it as easy as possible.'

The minister was shown around the unit's specialist bereavement suite, which offers a comforting and private setting for families dealing with the emotional and physical challenges of perinatal loss.

The

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