Children of men with low sperm counts have up to 150% increased risk of cancer, ... trends now

Children of men with low sperm counts have up to 150% increased risk of cancer, ... trends now
Children of men with low sperm counts have up to 150% increased risk of cancer, ... trends now

Children of men with low sperm counts have up to 150% increased risk of cancer, ... trends now

The children of men who suffer from fertility issues have an increased risk of developing cancers at a young age, research suggests.

A first-of-its-kind study found the families of men who have very few or no sperm in their semen were up to 150 percent more likely to be diagnosed with tumors than families of men who had normal sperm counts. 

For the study, researchers used Utah databases to collect information on men's first relatives - parent, sibling or child - second relative - grandparents or nieces and nephews - and third relatives - great grandparents or great uncles and aunts. 

The risk and the type of cancer varied greatly depending on how low the males' sperm counts were.

It is not known how many men in the United States experience low and no sperm counts, but previous data has estimated that one in 20 men experience infertility. 

The researchers didn't conclude why a relationship between sperm count and cancer existed, but are now carrying out genetic sequencing to search for specific gene mutations that may be driving the associations

The researchers didn't conclude why a relationship between sperm count and cancer existed, but are now carrying out genetic sequencing to search for specific gene mutations that may be driving the associations

The study found that among family members of men with no sperm, the results showed a 156 percent increased risk of bone and joint cancer, a 60 percent increased risk of lymphomas, a 56 percent increased risk of soft tissue cancer, a 54 percent increased risk of thyroid cancers and a 27 percent increased risk of cancers of the womb.

For relatives of men with low sperm, the results showed a 143 percent increased risk of bone and joint cancer, a 134 percent increased risk of testicular cancer and a 16 percent increased risk of colon cancer. 

One cancer, however, had a lower risk associated with it: esophageal cancer with a 61 percent decreased risk. 

Study author Joemy Ramsay of Utah University said: 'When family members share cancer risk patterns, it suggests that they have genetic, environmental, or health behaviors in common.

'By identifying which groups of families have similar cancer risk patterns we can improve our understanding of the biological mechanisms of both cancer and infertility.

'It will help us to assess the risk of cancer for

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