Why you might be drinking tap water, boiling your spuds and even brushing your ... trends now

Why you might be drinking tap water, boiling your spuds and even brushing your ... trends now
Why you might be drinking tap water, boiling your spuds and even brushing your ... trends now

Why you might be drinking tap water, boiling your spuds and even brushing your ... trends now

You might be drinking tap water all wrong.

Not only that, you might be boiling your spuds and brushing your teeth incorrectly, too. 

Little-known Government advice urges us to alter our tap water habits to reduce the risks of exposure to substance that could harm our health. 

These include never using cooking water from the hot tap, even if it's just to fill your boiling pan.

Here, MailOnline shares the guidance you probably had no idea about from Drinking Water Inspectorate (DWI)...

Government advice says Brits should avoid drinking or using water from the hot tap for cooking (stock image)

Government advice says Brits should avoid drinking or using water from the hot tap for cooking (stock image)

Never drink from the hot tap or use it for cooking

Compared to boiling the kettle, using water straight from the hot tap for cooking or making a brew may seem like an easy time-saving hack.

But the DWI warns people should only ever use the cold water tap from their kitchen for both drinking and cooking.

This is because water from the hot tap carries a greater risk of being contaminated with metals like copper and lead, both of which can have immediate and long-term health effects.

Although most houses no longer have lead pipes, the DWI still recommends against consuming water from the hot tap as the water can contain elevated levels of other metals. 

Even using such water for cooking, like filling a pot to boil potatoes quicker, is not recommended because boiling will not remove any potential metal traces. 

The DWI state: 'Remember that you should only be using cold water from the kitchen for drinking and cooking. 

'Water from the hot tap is not recommended for drinking as it can contain elevated levels of metals, such as copper, which makes the water taste astringent.' 

Live in an older house? Let the tap run until it turns cold before taking a drink 

Exposure to lead in household water can harm the mental development of children, as well as cause kidney and heart problems in adults.

Such is the concern that the use of the heavy metal in household piping has been banned since the 1970s.

But the DWI warns some houses in Britain might still contain the metal and people should be aware of the potential risk. 

Even modern homes aren't necessarily safe as unqualified plumbers or DIY home renovators may have used lead solder, the material used to connect two metal pipes, in the past.

The DWI says the easiest way people can check if they have lead pipes in their home is to find the stop tap.

If the pipe is a dull

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