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Flu shots may have increased risk of miscarriage

A puzzling study of US pregnancies found that women who had miscarriages between 2010 and 2012 were more likely to have had back-to-back annual flu shots that included protection against swine flu.

Vaccine experts think the results may reflect the older age and other miscarriage risks for the women, and not the flu shots. 

Health officials say there is no reason to change the government recommendation that all pregnant women be vaccinated against the flu. They say the flu itself is a much greater danger to women and their fetuses.

However, obstetricians are urging the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to investigate the findings as many fear women will stop getting shots.

Last night, the CDC has reached out to a doctor's group, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, to warn them the study is coming out and help them prepare for a potential wave of worry from expectant moms, CDC officials said.

A study of U.S. pregnancies suggests that women who received back-to-back flu shots between 2010 and 2012  after a new swine flu vaccine came out  more often had miscarriages

A study of U.S. pregnancies suggests that women who received back-to-back flu shots between 2010 and 2012  after a new swine flu vaccine came out  more often had miscarriages

'I want the CDC and researchers to continue to investigate this,' said Dr. Laura Riley, a Boston-based obstetrician who leads a committee on maternal immunization. 'But as an advocate for pregnant women, what I hope doesn't happen is that people panic and stop getting vaccinated.'

Past studies have found flu vaccines are safe during pregnancy, though there's been little research on impact of flu vaccinations given in the first three months of pregnancy.

Flu and its complications kill thousands of Americans every year. The elderly, young children and pregnant women are especially at risk. When a new 'swine flu' strain emerged in

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