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Don't like seeing your dentist? Try a tooth decay vaccine

Dreaded trips to see your dentist could be replaced with a vaccine to prevent tooth decay in the future, researchers predict.

The jab, developed by Chinese scientists, offers a dose of proteins that are effective at removing build-ups of plaque responsible for cavities.

Early trials show it to be 64 per cent effective - meaning people would still have to brush their teeth twice a day to avoid a trip to the dentist's chair.

It offers hope of a 'fantastic' answer for preventing or even reversing cavities, which strike a third of adults, according to figures.

The researchers said the vaccine would be welcomed in Western countries, where teeth-rotting sugar is consumed heavily.

The jab, developed by Chinese scientists, offers a dose of proteins that are effective at removing build-ups of plaque responsible for cavities

The jab, developed by Chinese scientists, offers a dose of proteins that are effective at removing build-ups of plaque responsible for cavities

But the team at the Wuhan Institute of Virology said the jab is several years away from undergoing clinical tests. However, experts are excited.

What do the experts think? 

Dr Richard Marques, a Harley Street dentist, told MailOnline: 'This sounds like a fantastic development in dentistry.   

'Preventing tooth decay through vaccination would totally change the dental situation of many children and adults around the world.  

'Dental decay is such a problem and a drain on healthcare resources so this has the potential to transform dental healthcare.'

It works by using proteins from the bacteria Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) - which is the main cause of dental cavities.

They are then fused together with proteins derived from strains of E. coli bacteria, Science Alert reports. 

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