Mother-of-two, 34, with an incurable cancer releases shocking photos of its ...

A mother dying from cancer has released harrowing photographs of the damage the disease has caused to her face and body as she revealed she has refused to bond with her young children to spare them grieving for her. 

Kim Debling, 34, from Basingstoke, who may have just months to left to live, is glad Rose, one, and Harvey, six months, won't be able to remember her.

The former RAF air traffic controller is currently battling stage four Cutaneous T-Cell lymphoma, which has left her virtually unrecognisable.

Her face has been ravaged with red lumps from the form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which doctors diagnosed her with during her first pregnancy.

However, it returned when Mrs Debling, of Basingstoke, Hampshire, was expecting Harvey and spread across her body. Doctors branded it incurable.

Mrs Debling, who said the cancer makes her feel like a monster, has been told she has months left to live - unless she can undergo a pioneering stem cell transplant.  

However doctors warn she is currently too unwell to go through with the procedure, which could give her another five years - even though a donor has been found.  

Mrs Debling has a six-month-old son and a daughter who is a year old, she said: 'I know Rose and Harvey won’t remember me, and that’s a good thing.

'No Disney character ever became a hero without losing a parent, but in a way, I don’t want the kids to get to know me, so I can save them the terrible loss.'

Kim Debling, 34, from Basingstoke, Hampshire, is virtually unrecognisable after red lumps ravaged her face - caused by her stage four Cutaneous T-Cell lymphoma

Kim Debling, 34, from Basingstoke, Hampshire, is virtually unrecognisable after red lumps ravaged her face - caused by her stage four Cutaneous T-Cell lymphoma

Speaking about her decision of choosing not to bond with her children, Mrs Debling added: 'I wonder what my children will think of me, and what conclusions they will draw about me when I am gone.'

Mrs Debling added: 'But I still want to be the best mum I can ever be, no matter how long I have left.' 

Mrs Debling and her RAF pilot husband Steve, 32, who she met on an air base and married in December 2012, began trying for a baby soon after their day.

Desperate to become parents, the pair, who have served in Iraq and Afghanistan, were referred for IVF on the NHS after a year and a half with no success.

Mrs Debling became pregnant after just one round in November 2015.

With her mind focused on her baby, she thought nothing of it when she noticed a red rash around her waist, only casually mentioning it to her GP during a routine appointment about her pregnancy a few weeks later. 

The former RAF air traffic controller has even bravely admitted she is glad her young children will not remember her to spare them the pain of grieving for her (pictured in Afghanistan)

The former RAF air traffic controller has even bravely admitted she is glad her young children will not remember her to spare them the pain of grieving for her (pictured in Afghanistan)

Mrs Debling battled the cancer while pregnant with Rose, now one, when she had a red rash appear on her waist. However, it returned when she was expecting her second child, Harvey, now six months (pictured with both children and husband Steve, 32, in hospital)

Mrs Debling battled the cancer while pregnant with Rose, now one, when she had a red rash appear on her waist. However, it returned when she was expecting her second child, Harvey, now six months (pictured with both children and husband Steve, 32, in hospital)

WHAT IS CUTANEOUS T-CELL LYMPHOMA? 

Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that affects the skin. 

Macmillan Cancer Support state it is caused by white blood cells, called T-cell lymphocytes, growing in an uncontrolled way.

Experts estimate that CTCL accounts for around four per cent of all non-Hodgkin lymphoma diagnoses.

Figures show there are 13,000 people diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the UK each year - and around 75,000 in the US. 

Symptoms of the cancer, which can be mistaken for psoriasis or eczema in its early stages, include red rash-like patches, lumps on the skin and swollen lymph nodes.

Treatment revolves around creams, radiotherapy and a form of light therapy called PUVA, or photochemo. 

She explained: 'We could not have been happier to be expecting our first baby. 

'We had waited for so long for it to happen that the red patches were the last thing on my mind.

'But when I finally saw the GP I did mention it, as it had spread to the tops of my thighs.

'I was given some cream for it, thinking it was just a nasty rash, as well as being referred to a dermatologist.'

Mrs Debling met with a skin specialist at Basingstoke and North Hampshire Hospital and had a biopsy of her skin taken in March 2016. 

Convinced she was just suffering with dermatitis, a type of eczema, she tried not to worry.

But in May 2016, when she was 24 weeks pregnant, doctors broke the news that she actually had cancer. 

Mrs Debling said: 'When I heard the word "lymphoma" I was completely devastated.

'They told me I had a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that affects the skin, where the symptoms are a raised, rash or itchy patches of skin, lumps on the skin and swollen lymph nodes.

Mrs Debling has now been told she has months left to live, unless she can have a pioneering stem cell transplant, which could give her five extra years

Mrs Debling has now been told she has months left to live, unless she can have a pioneering stem cell transplant, which could give her five extra years

Although, doctors warn that she is too unwell to go through with the procedure, currently - even though a donor has been found (pictured during face radiotherapy)

Although, doctors warn that she is too unwell to go through with the procedure, currently - even though a donor has been found (pictured during face radiotherapy)

Mrs Debling became pregnant in November 2015. Focused on her baby, she thought nothing of it when she noticed a red rash around her waist (pictured during face radiotherapy)

Mrs Debling became pregnant in November 2015. Focused on her baby, she thought nothing of it when she noticed a red rash around her waist (pictured during face radiotherapy)

'My only saving grace was that it was stage one, meaning it wasn’t aggressive, so they could treat the skin directly with light treatments.'

After that, Mrs Debling had ultraviolet

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