Boy, 8, with skin condition that causes blisters uses laughing gas to ease pain

A little boy with a rare disease that causes his skin to blister at the slightest touch inhales laughing gas as a way to escape the terrible pain of his daily routine.

Evan Prescott, eight, was diagnosed at birth with epidermolysis bullosa (EB), a rare genetic tissue disorder that causes the skin to blister and burst, leaving raw sores that are susceptible to infections.  

Twice each day, Evan goes through a painful skincare routine which involves cleaning, lancing and draining his painful blisters, which used to leave him screaming out in pain. 

For the first six months of his life, Evan, from Mercier in Quebec, Canada, was on opioids to deal with the agony before his mother Yandy Macabuag, 35, and his father Marc, 37, decided to wean him off.

After trying a multitude of options that didn't work, doctors suggested laughing gas as a way to relax Evan during the routine. 

Now Evan spends an hour each morning and evening inhaling through the tube and exhaling through his mouth while his parents treat the sores.

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Tragic: Evan Prescott, eight (pictured), from Mercier in Quebec, Canada uses laughing gas to escape the terrible pain that comes from his rare disease that causes his skin to blister

Tragic: Evan Prescott, eight (pictured), from Mercier in Quebec, Canada uses laughing gas to escape the terrible pain that comes from his rare disease that causes his skin to blister

Evan (pictured, as a baby) was diagnosed at birth with epidermolysis bullosa (EB)

EB is a rare genetic tissue disorder that causes the skin to blister and burst, leaving raw sores that are susceptible to infections (Pictured, Evan as a baby)

Painful: Evan (left and right) was diagnosed at birth with epidermolysis bullosa (EB), a rare genetic tissue disorder that causes the skin to blister and burst, leaving raw sores that are susceptible to infections

Sufferers of EB are missing type VII collagen - a protein that allows the top layer of skin to bind with the bottom layers.

The slightest movement causes the skin to constantly and consistently fall off. 

Evan spent the first six months of his life wrapped in bandages. 

'His hands, his fingers had to be individually wrapped - his toes, everything had to be separated,' Yandy told CTV News.  

Evan often moves around on his knees because the bottoms of his feet can be the most painful part of his body. At school, he uses a wheelchair to get around.  

And every two days, he takes salt baths to dry out the skin and minimize any potential health complications. 

Twice each day, Evan (pictured, as a baby) goes through a painful skincare routine

It involves cleaning, lancing and draining his painful blisters, which used to leave Evan (pictured, as a baby) screaming out in pain

Devastating: Twice each day, Evan (left and right) goes through a painful skincare routine which involves cleaning, lancing and draining his painful blisters. which used to leave him screaming out in pain

Every two days, Evan (pictured) takes salt baths

The salt baths dry out the skin and minimize any potential health complications (Pictured, Evan)

Struggling: Every two days, Evan (left and right) takes salt baths to dry out the skin and minimize any potential health complications

Hope: Two years ago, medics at Montreal Children's Hospital decided to give Evan (pictured) nitrous oxide - better known as laughing gas - to help make his skin care routine bearable

Hope: Two years ago, medics at Montreal Children's Hospital decided to give Evan (pictured) nitrous oxide - better known as laughing gas - to help make his skin care routine bearable

Change: Evan (pictured) regularly breathes in the gas as a way to cope with the pain as his mom treats his blisters and wounds. He is believed to be the first child in North America to use the gas at home

Change: Evan (pictured) regularly breathes in the gas as a way to cope with the pain as his mom treats his blisters and wounds. He is believed to be the first child in North America to use the gas at home

Yandy and Marc decided to wean Evan off opiates, such as morphine, when he was six months old because they were concerned about the long-term impact on his development.

Preclinical animal studies have shown evidence that morphine can alter hippocampal development in a developing brain. 

As he grew, Evan's medical team explored many

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