sport news Adam Hastings doesn't feel too much pressure as he follows in footsteps of ...

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As the former captain of both Scotland and the Lions, Gavin Hastings is one of the nation's true rugby legends. 

His 22-year-old son Adam is following in his footsteps and has already become a full Scotland international, who looks set to be included in Gregor Townsend's squad for the World Cup later this year in Japan.

Before that, however, Adam and his Glasgow Warriors team-mates will be looking to take the Pro14 title and, to that end, face rivals Edinburgh at Scotstoun in a crucial derby on Saturday evening. 

Here, Sportsmail rugby correspondent Rob Robertson sits down with father and son to talk past, present and future for the Hastings family.

Adam Hastings is following in his dad's footsteps by representing Scotland in the rugby side

Adam Hastings is following in his dad's footsteps by representing Scotland in the rugby side

Adam, alongside dad Gavin, spoke exclusively to Sportsmail at a Land Rover event in Glasgow

Adam, alongside dad Gavin, spoke exclusively to Sportsmail at a Land Rover event in Glasgow

Gavin, did you ever put pressure on Adam to become a rugby player when he was growing up?

Gavin: Absolutely not. There are some parents that you see on the touchline and they just shout constantly. If they honestly think that is doing any good to their kid then I am sorry, they are barking up the wrong tree. I almost consciously went the other way and made the decision not to say anything. 

I'd had my rugby playing days and it was up to Adam to decide if he wanted a rugby career, too, not me. Some of those parents who shout from the touchline live their sporting lives through their kids. 

They don't need to don't that. Look, I am not saying I am totally right and they are totally wrong but I chose not to go down that route.

Adam: Dad was always there for advice but he did it privately. He never butted in and I appreciate him for taking that approach. He never fully coached me but gave me little hints here and there when I was growing up. To be honest, a lot of times during my early years it was a case of me figuring things out for myself which was a good thing.

Gavin Hastings is considered one of Scotland's finest rugby players from his generation

Gavin Hastings is considered one of Scotland's finest rugby players from his generation

Gavin: Adam is very much his own man and always has been. He knew that for him to make it in the game he needed to be totally dedicated and take responsibility for what he did out on the pitch and learn lessons from it.

Adam, was it tough having such a famous dad when you were growing up in Scotland?

Adam: Maybe a little bit in the early days but not too much. People spoke about my old man at school and the boys were winding me up at times over who he was but that was always going to happen and no big deal.

When did you realise your dad had played a bit?

Adam: Only through watching old replays and people telling me! He retired just after I was born in 1996. I ended his rugby career (laughing).

Gavin: I was done by about then. I played my last Scotland game the year before.

Adam: Up until the age of about 12 I only knew he played rugby to a high level and folk knew he played rugby and stopped in the street sometimes to talk to him. I had seen stock footage of him playing but that was about it. I joked once it was only on a black and white TV I saw my dad play but it was in colour.

Gavin: I wasn't that old!

When did you realise that Adam had potential to be a bit of a player himself?

Gavin: He played with the family in the back garden growing up and at school but going to Millfield School (a renowned sports school in Somerset that produced the likes of Sir Gareth Edwards, former England captain Chris Robshaw and Scotland international Huw Jones) at 17 was the realisation he had potential and is when his rugby career really kicked on. 

It was a conscious decision to send him there as the family thought it would be a good move for Adam because of its reputation as a top school for sport but he had to agree and ultimately the final decision would be his whether to go or not.

Was it an easy decision for you to leave Scotland, Adam?

Adam: It was a really tough one as I was at day school at George Watson's in Edinburgh and lived ten minutes away. I had been there since nursery so I knew everybody. I had to decide at the age of 17 whether I wanted to go to a boarding school down south where I knew not a person to help my rugby career or stay put.

Adam, representing Glasgow Warriors, is continuing to push his team-mates to the Pro14 title

Adam, representing Glasgow Warriors, is continuing to push his team-mates to the Pro14 title

Gavin: I had two years playing rugby at Cambridge University and loved every minute of it and knew the move south would help Adam but didn't want to influence his decision too much. 

Going to Cambridge was a big part of my rugby education and as a family we felt going to Millfield for his final years at school would help Adam's development as a rugby player and a person.

Adam: Dad's right, it did but I was a bit worried going down there. I was 17 years old and it is tough to make new friends at that age at a

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