sport news Behind closed doors at Alberto Salazar's doping factory

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As an athlete who pushed too hard at the 1982 Boston Marathon, Alberto Salazar received the last rites. As a coach who pushed too hard for an advantage, there will be no resurrection.

The question now, with his status in the ground, is how many others will end up there with him and what it will mean for Sir Mo Farah and UK Athletics in particular.

What reputations will fall in the wake of this guilty verdict for doping violations?

Several reputations could fall in the wake of Alberto Salazar's (centre) guilty verdict for doping

Several reputations could fall in the wake of Alberto Salazar's (centre) guilty verdict for doping

It took the US Anti-Doping Agency four years to get the Cuban-born American — concluding with the statement detailing why he would be banned until October 2023. But the 61-year-old's name had unofficially been mud long in advance of the final ruling.

He always had an obsession with victory — winning three straight New York Marathons from 1980 and nearly dying in the heat when winning in Boston — but as a coach since the mid-1990s he has pushed the boundaries of what was permissible.

The majority of his work has been done at the Nike Oregon Project, a sprawling lab he effectively created in 2001 and which he has operated as his fiefdom.

It explored any avenue for increased performance, from altitude tents around an athlete's bed to the prescription of unnecessary legal supplements. He became one of the most hyped coaches in the world and certainly one of the most thorough, as we have learned with some shock.

As an example, the ruling spoke of Salazar using his two sons as guinea pigs in June 2009 as a means of establishing how much testosterone gel could be applied before breaching the legal limits.

Disgraced athletics coach Salazar had used his two sons as guinea pigs in rogue tests

Disgraced athletics coach Salazar had used his two sons as guinea pigs in rogue tests

His justification through the case was built on an elaborate paranoia about one of his athletes being sabotaged by a rival camp and wanting to experiment on what it would take. USADA contended the 'respondent committed an anti-doping rule violation because he 'gave' a Prohibited Substance to a third party'.

That the closed doors of the lab opened at all came down to whistleblowers and journalism. Steve Magness operated as the former, having served as an assistant coach before his exit after 18 months in 2012.

He became concerned at what was going on there and would go on to tell the BBC's Mark Daly that the NOP gold-silver of Mo Farah and Galen Rupp in the 10,000m at London 2012 was 'one of the most disheartening moments of my life'.

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