sport news Arsenal legend Patrick Vieira on Arsene Wenger, Roy Keane and managing in ...

This is Patrick Vieira's manor. Back on the French Riviera, just 20 miles up the coastline from where he began his career at . The Nice manager is at home here.

From the moment he strides through the giant crystal ball entrance of his club's new, state-of-the-art training complex, Vieira exudes authority.

Later, posing for Sportsmail's photographer on a red leather chair in the vast atrium, the 6ft 3in Arsenal legend looks every bit the boss of the building.

Patrick Vieira says that what he achieved as a player doesn't grant him extra time as a coach

Patrick Vieira says that what he achieved as a player doesn't grant him extra time as a coach

Vieira outlined to Sportsmail that he wants people to talk about him as a coach, not a player

Vieira outlined to Sportsmail that he wants people to talk about him as a coach, not a player

After gaining experience at Manchester City and New York City, Vieira took the next step

After gaining experience at Manchester City and New York City, Vieira took the next step

Just as in his playing days, Vieira commands the respect of his peers, who all shake his hand as he passes them on his way up the spiral staircase. 

But while this place feels the perfect fit for the Frenchman, he is aware that being a national hero — a man who won the World Cup on home soil in 1998 — brings its own pitfalls.

'It is a lot of pressure and expectation,' admits Vieira, dressed smartly in a navy blue blazer and jumper.

'People expect you to do well because you are a World Cup winner. But being a World Cup winner only gives you one or two weeks' grace as a coach. My legacy and the confidence of the fans, the players, the people around the football club will come with what I deliver on the pitch — and I want people to talk about me as a coach, not as a player.

'The player was what I did and what I achieved. I am really proud of that, it is fantastic, but I put it to the side. I use it as an experience to talk to the players or give them advice, but I want people to look at me as a coach.'

Vieira stressed that the challenges that he has faced at Nice have made him better as a coach

Vieira stressed that the challenges that he has faced at Nice have made him better as a coach

Nine years have passed since Vieira, 43, hung up his boots, but his coaching career still feels like it's in its infancy. He is halfway through his second full season at Nice. 

After finishing seventh in his first season, they are 11th in Ligue 1 but only four points off the European qualifying places.

Before that, he had two campaigns managing New York City in the MLS, having started out at Manchester City — his last club as a player — as football development executive and then head coach of their Under 21s. Each move has been strategic towards achieving his ambitions.

'Every step I've made prepares me for the future,' Vieira says. 'I want to be the best I can be and I will give myself the best chance to achieve that. I want to win trophies. I want to be successful.

'At City, I spent a lot of time in different departments, so I understand how a club is run. They opened every single door for me to learn the job. Going to New York, I felt the pressure a bit more with getting the results, working with professional players for the first time… it was an unbelievable experience.

The 43-year-old stated that he elected to take charge of Nice as it is a place where he can grow

The 43-year-old stated that he elected to take charge of Nice as it is a place where he can grow

'I came to Nice because it is a club that is still growing and it is a place for me to grow as well. I saw City grow and it is the same here. The philosophy of the club is develop young talent and they have big ambitions. They are building a structure to play European football on a regular basis. 

'The 18 months have been challenging on the field, off the field, but those experiences make me a better coach. If one day I leave Nice, I would like people to say, 'Patrick took this club to a different level'. That's really important to me.'

The off-field challenge Vieira refers to is the uncertainty created by the club's change of ownership last year when billionaire Chien Lee sold to Britain's richest man, Jim Ratcliffe.

The Nice boss wants to be seen as having managed to take the club to another level

The Nice boss wants to be seen as having managed to take the club to another level

Vieira says he feels more settled now he is working under Ratcliffe, even if the founder of chemicals company Ineos is a fan who admitted last year he 'used to hate' the ex-Arsenal captain, saying, 'He really was a b******!'

Vieira smiles. 'We talk and laugh about that. That is the love and hate between the Arsenal fan and the United fan. But it is all about the love of the game and his knowledge for the game is unbelievable. He is, as you say in England, a gentleman… even if he is a massive United fan!'

'I am calm but I have moments where I let myself go,' Vieira says when asked to describe his character as a coach. It is not a surprising admission from a man who was sent off eight times in the Premier League, a record.

'When I was playing, I was myself on the field and I want to be the same as a coach. I still want to show the passion that I had when I was playing. I want to express myself. I don't want to pretend to be somebody I am not.'

Vieira admitted that Mario Balotelli's mindset 'was difficult for a collective sport'

Vieira admitted that Mario Balotelli's mindset 'was difficult for a collective sport'

An inspirational leader as a player, Vieira has always set standards for others to follow, something he has taken into management.

'When a player doesn't respect what we put in place, I will let him know. Of course I can shout. When I am not happy I will be really loud, because players need to understand there are things I cannot tolerate.

'If we want to live well altogether with respect, we need to have rules and we need to respect them. People who don't respect those rules can be

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