sport news BBC hold 'avoiding racial bias' training session with on-air talent ahead of ...

BBC hold 'avoiding racial bias' training session with on-air talent ahead of the new football season with phrases such as 'nitty gritty', 'sold down the river' and 'blackballed' put on a banned list The BBC held an 'avoiding racial bias' training session with their on-air talent The purpose of the session was to avoid using certain words or phrases A total of 450 people from broadcasting took part, Sportsmail understands 

By Kieran Gill for the Daily Mail

Published: 17:09 BST, 8 September 2020 | Updated: 17:46 BST, 8 September 2020

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The BBC held an 'avoiding racial bias' training session with on-air talent on Tuesday, listing the words and phrases which must be avoided ahead of the new season.

'Cakewalk', 'nitty gritty', 'sold down the river' and 'uppity' were among those on the banned list, Sportsmail can reveal, along with 'blackballed', 'blacklisted', 'black mark' and 'whiter than white'.

Those tuning in to the webinar were also warned about how describing black players as having 'pace' or 'power' could see them fall into 'the trap of racial stereotyping'.

The BBC held an 'avoiding racial bias' training session with on-air talent on Tuesday

The BBC held an 'avoiding racial bias' training session with on-air talent on Tuesday

The session was staged by the BBC, in partnership with the PFA, whose recent 'Racial Bias in Football Commentary Study' shined a light on everyday language which could offend.

A total of 450 people took part in the session, Sportsmail understands, with the BBC inviting Sky Sports, ITV, BT Sport, Premier League production and talkSPORT to dial in.

The talk was also chaired by Sky's Jessica Creighton, as there were several speakers on the webinar, calling for an end to 'lazy journalism'. Sportsmail's Mike Keegan previously revealed how 'nitty gritty' was on the banned list at Sky amid concerns over links to slavery.

The purpose of the session was to avoid using certain words or phrases ahead of new season

The purpose of the session was to avoid using certain words or phrases ahead of new season

In a guide sent to participants of Tuesday's call, explanations were given for each phrase that should be avoided by commentators and co-commentators ahead of the new season.

For 'cakewalk', it was written that it 'originated as a dance performed by enslaved black people on plantations before the American Civil War' who 'competed for a cake'.

'Uppity' is banned because of its use by 'white people during racial segregation in the US to describe black people they believed weren't showing them enough deference'.

Other speakers included Jason Lee – equalities education executive at the PFA – and BBC commentator trainer Rob Nothman. Mark Scott and Tom Gayle – two freelance commentators – and Daniel Kilvington, a senior lecturer of Leeds Beckett University, also spoke.

LANGUAGE TO AVOID THIS SEASON

*all of the copy below has been taken from the BBC's Avoiding Racial Bias guide, as seen by Sportsmail:

CAKEWALK – The cakewalk originated as a dance performed by enslaved black people on plantations before the American Civil War. Owners held contests in which

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