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The world is a more complicated place than it was when Liverpool's progress was mapped by a group of coaches who sat around on upturned beer crates in a windowless former kit store called the Boot Room.

But having brought the title home at last, the more curious minds around Anfield will surely ask what kept it coming? How did they win it six times in eight years?

A lack of pomp, certainly. Medals were ritually dished out from a cardboard box. But a relentless process of renewal, too. Not a year went by in those great years without the club paying out substantially for a new arrival — and it was generally only one.

Liverpool's performance against Leeds didn't show the lethal intensity we have come to know

Liverpool's performance against Leeds didn't show the lethal intensity we have come to know

Mo Salah's contribution suggested the debate about what goes on behind him is academic

Mo Salah's contribution suggested the debate about what goes on behind him is academic

Phil Neal, David Johnson, Alan Hansen, Alan Kennedy, Frank McGarvey, Ian Rush, Mark Lawrenson all marked the changing of the seasons.

The club did not always need these improvements. Rush waited two years to break through. Kennedy was initially unconvincing. McGarvey did not play once. But the thinking was that a little more competitive tension was good.

There are risks attached to drawing conclusions from the first instalment in the current squad's title defence. These are early days and extraordinary times. But this was certainly not the lethal intensity we have come to know.

'They kill you in a football way. They just don't stop.' That's what managers usually say about Liverpool. It was actually Jurgen Klopp's description of Leeds.

The promoted side's second equaliser was a metaphor for Liverpool's casualness.

Jurgen Klopp unconvincingly suggested that Van Dijk's blunder was a 'misunderstanding'

Jurgen Klopp unconvincingly suggested that Van Dijk's blunder was a 'misunderstanding'

The high ball Virgil van Dijk tried to ease around the corner for Andy Robertson, presenting Patrick Bamford with his goal on a plate, screamed complacency — for all his manager's attempts to dress it up as a something else. 'A misunderstanding between Virgil and Alisson — one of those things that can happen,' Klopp suggested, unconvincingly.

But Van Dijk's mind had also drifted somewhere else moments earlier, when he failed to clock Bamford loitering freely in space behind him. The striker might have capitalised had Pablo Hernandez found a better ball from the left.

Klopp either did not hear, or did not want to, when asked if Leeds' intensity was why Liverpool had struggled defensively or whether there was 'more to it than that?' So the question was put again.

Jack Robinson scored Leeds' first, he said, because both Trent Alexander-Arnold and Robertson were both higher than the centre halves. 'That should never happen in football,' said Klopp.

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