sport news 's trips to Istanbul always catch fire and next up is a ...

are preparing for an eighth European night in Istanbul this week when Ole Gunnar Solskjaer's side face Istanbul Basaksehir and if history tells them anything, it will not be a trip for the faint-hearted.

Granted, this time round the stands will not be bursting at the seams with supporters, the famous wall of noise synonymous with games in Turkey gone.

Sir Alex Ferguson vowed 'never to return' to the city of Istanbul after a frightening night in 1993. Gary Pallister once described a European night in Istanbul as 'making Anfield look like a tea party'.

Manchester United's previous trips to Istanbul have been littered with moments of real toxicity

's previous trips to Istanbul have been littered with moments of real toxicity

The famous 'Welcome to Hell' banner was on display when United visited Istanbul in 1993

The famous 'Welcome to Hell' banner was on display when United visited Istanbul in 1993

Hostilities are ever-present. Even Jose Mourinho could not resist riling up rabid supporters in 2016 when he said of Fenerbahce: 'They were playing the Champions League final, we were playing a summer friendly.' 

And so trips to Istanbul are like few others on the continent and United's past should serve as a warning to young stars embarking for Turkey for the first time. 

A trip down memory lane serves up a reminder of that brutal night 'in hell' back in 1993 where United's players clashed with pitchside police, a hammering at the hands of Fenerbahce in 2004 and a miserable 2012 night where a warning that 'No Mercy Will Be Shown' bore fruit as Ferguson's side were humbled.

Sportsmail reflects back on some of United's most famous - and most disappointing - trips to the Turkish city. 

Galatasaray 0-0  

Date: November 3, 1993 

Sparks flew in the first leg and as Galatasaray departed Old Trafford having produced a stunning 3-3 draw, they received a sinister warning.

'They will be waiting for you at the airport,' Galatasaray boss Reiner Hollmann promised. Little did United know what was to come.

Touching down at Ataturk airport even United's gladiatorial personalities of Roy Keane, Bryan Robson, Paul Ince, Peter Schmeichel and Eric Cantona felt a tremor of trepidation.

They smiled, looking to appear relaxed, as maniacal Galatasaray supporters thrust themselves up against glass dividers in the arrivals area. 

Fans pushed up against glass at the airport in an attempt to unnerve United's arriving stars

Fans pushed up against glass at the airport in an attempt to unnerve United's arriving stars

'Welcome to Hell,' read one, now famous, banner. 'This is your last 48 hours,' read another.

This was not Maine Road against Manchester City or Anfield against Liverpool. Istanbul was a different world entirely. The ferocious welcome was just the start, too.

Arriving at the hotel, Pallister, who missed the game through injury, recalls arriving at their luxury base and dawdling behind the rest of his team-mates after disembarking the coach. 

As he got to the door he was met by a bellboy. Pallister smiled but in return the bellboy ran his across his throat in a slit gesture. There was to be no Turkish delight even off the pitch. 

Speaking of their treatment on arrival, he later added in his autobiography: 'It was a terrifying business which had nothing to do with sport, and can be categorised objectively as an absolute disgrace.' 

In all of Ferguson's time in charge this stands out as the most acidic of tests. 

Players were sent out on to the pitch to soak up the atmosphere an hour or so before kick-off at the Scot's request. Up the stairs they went, through a sea of police officers and there they were. Again, players are seen laughing and in amazement at the wall of noise and the colour of the flares.

Gary Neville, then 18, later described how he felt the Ali Sami Yen stadium was on fire.

As Pallister put it, it 'made Anfield look like a tea party' and he wasn't wrong.

United's No 9 was confronted after he elbowed Galatasaray's reserve goalkeeper in the chest

United's No 9 was confronted after he elbowed Galatasaray's reserve goalkeeper in the chest

The Frenchman was incensed at the time-wasting on a trip that remains iconic for both sides

The Frenchman was incensed at the time-wasting on a trip that remains iconic for both sides

The game itself was largely a non-event for 77 minutes, Schmeichel the busier of the two goalkeepers. Galatasaray, with three away goals in their arsenal, were keen to run the clock down.

That angered Cantona - it didn't take much, in truth - and the Frenchman decided to kick the ball out of the hands of Galatasaray reserve keeper Nezih Ali Bologlu's. If that wasn't enough he then sent him to the floor with an elbow to the chest.

Cantona did not see red but retribution was to follow. 

He was later shown a red after accusing the referee of being corrupt - something a UEFA investigation into the game never proved. Cantona was incensed as he was frogmarched off the pitch by a policeman. He wanted revenge. 

What followed was a horrifying finale as United's European exit was confirmed. As they looked to walk down the steps towards the changing room, a number of players reported being attacked by police.

Bryan Robson was cut and Cantona was struck by a truncheon among the melee at the end. All hell broke loose and those warnings at the airport felt as jarring as ever.

'Eric was determined to sort out the rogue cop who had been wielding his truncheon,' Keane later said in his autobiography.

'Eric was a big, strong lad. He was serious. He insisted he was going to kill that f***er. It took the combined efforts of the manager, Brian Kidd and a few of the players to restrain him.' 

Cantona was marched off the pitch having been shown red and all hell soon broke loose

Cantona was marched off the pitch having been shown red and all hell soon broke loose

The coach out of the stadium was another moment of incredible violence with rocks and bricks thrown. Steve Bruce recounted how a brick almost came through the window where he was sat. He was incredibly fortunate not to be maimed. 

There was also stories of terror away from the squad on the trip as 164 supporters were imprisoned in Bayrampasa jail.

Allegations followed that they were beaten and separated from their possessions before being deported back to the UK.  

Ferguson said: 'We were exposed to as much hostility and harassment as I have ever

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