sport news Where are England's 2010-11 Ashes heroes now?

Nothing quite comes close to the Boxing Day Test at the Melbourne Cricket Ground.

It is the pinnacle of the cricketing calendar. And not just for the 100,000 Australians baying for blood.

Cricketing badgers on the other side of the world will happily pop open another bottle as Christmas Day winds down, curl up by the fire and settle down to the sights and sounds of the MCG.

England's players celebrate after clinching the 2010-11 Ashes series down under

England's players celebrate after clinching the 2010-11 Ashes series down under

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Graeme Swann leads the celebrations with the 'Sprinkler' dance move at the MCG

Graeme Swann leads the celebrations with the 'Sprinkler' dance move at the MCG

Ten years ago these night owls were in for a special treat with the 2010-11 Ashes on a knife edge after Australia roared back in Perth to bring the series level.

England won the toss, elected to field, and the rest is history. 

Ricky Ponting's men collapsed to a humiliating 98 all out, and the MCG emptied as Andrew Strauss and Alastair Cook led England to 157 without loss at the end of the day.

England's fans serenade Mitchell Johnson as England pile on the runs in the fifth Test

England's fans serenade Mitchell Johnson as England pile on the runs in the fifth Test

Jimmy Anderson was one of England's heroes as Australia were bowled out for 98 in 2010

Jimmy Anderson was one of England's heroes as Australia were bowled out for 98 in 2010

They went on to win by an innings and 157 runs, retaining the urn in the process.

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A week later they did it again in Sydney, claiming a first series win Down Under in 24 years. 

But what has become of that side, who eight months later went on to become No 1 in the world? Sportsmail take a look... 

England's players celebrate after taking the final Australian wicket in the fifth Test

England's players celebrate after taking the final Australian wicket in the fifth Test

Alastair Cook, Graeme Swann and Jimmy Anderson with the urn in the SCG dressing room

Alastair Cook, Graeme Swann and Jimmy Anderson with the urn in the SCG dressing room

Andrew Strauss

Strauss went down as one of England's greatest ever captains, leading the Test side to No 1 in the world rankings just seven months after they retained the urn in 2011.

His retirement a year later was overshadowed by the damaging fallout with star man Kevin Pietersen, but Strauss went on to prove his leadership qualities extended off the field.

He became the ECB's director of cricket at its lowest ebb in 2015, and immediately set about overhauling England's limited overs set-up.

After finishing as runners up in the 2016 Twenty20 World Cup, they went one better in the 50-over format on home soil in 2019 in memorable .

But Strauss had relinquished his position by that point to care for his wife as she underwent treatment for lung cancer. Since her passing in December 2018, he set up the Ruth Strauss Foundation to provide emotional support for families to prepare for the death of a parent from cancer and raise awareness of the need for more research in the fight against non-smoking lung cancers.

Strauss, knighted last year, has helped set up an annual #RedForRuth Test match in the English summer, which raises money for the campaign, while he also remains an occasional fixture in the Sky Sports commentary box. 

Andrew Strauss received a knighthood this year

Alastair Cook became a knight in 2017

England's opening partners, Andrew Strauss (left) and Alastair Cook, have both been knighted

Alastair Cook

England's top scorer of that victorious Ashes series with an astonishing 766 runs, including three centuries. Cook went on to enjoy a stellar career.

He succeeded Strauss as captain in 2012, winning in India and beating Australia at home before the disastrous whitewash defeat in 2013-14.

Redemption arrived 20 months later as England reclaimed the urn on home soil in 2015. Cook resigned the captaincy in 2017 and retired a year later, scoring an emotional century - his 33rd in Tests - in his final match at The Oval.

He retired as England's leading Test scorer and the fifth highest in history.

Still playing for Essex, who he has helped to back-to-back Championship titles, Cook, knighted in 2017, is also carving out a career in the commentary box with Test Match Special, and remains devoted to his farm work out of season. 

Jimmy Anderson

Ten years after his 24 wickets propelled England to Ashes glory, Anderson remains the leader of England's attack.

His hair may now be flecked with the odd dash of grey, but his mastery of the red ball knows no limits, and in August he took his 600th Test wicket for England - the first fast bowler ever to do so. Only Anil Kumble, Shane Warne and Muttiah Muralitharan lie ahead of him in the all-time rankings.

Jimmy Anderson celebrates after claiming his 600th Test wicket for England in August

Jimmy Anderson celebrates after claiming his 600th Test wicket for England in August

Even at 38 he is still hungry for more, and next year's Ashes looks likely to be his swansong tour following the debacles of 2013-14 and 2017-18.

Anderson's post-playing days look set to be played out in the media. He has married occasional work with the TMS commentary team with the BBC's Tailenders podcast, alongside Radio One DJ Greg James and former Maccabees guitarist Felix White, which has gone on to achieve cult status within cricketing circles.

A move into media work wasn't immediately obvious from his cameo appearances in Swanny's Ashes Video Diaries. His monosyllabic deadpan delivery remains, but there are few that can match his expertise for swing bowling.

Ian Bell 

Ian Bell played his final first class game for Warwickshire in September this year

Ian Bell played his final first class game for Warwickshire in September this year

It proved to be a coming-of-age series for the classy Bell, whose 12th Test ton - and first against Australia - came in the crushing victory in Sydney.

It was the first of five centuries during his annus mirabilis of 2011, before his three hundreds underpinned another Ashes victory in 2013.

Bell was dropped by England two years later, shortly after he became part of a select group to have won five Ashes series for England. Bell's cover drive became a common sight on the county circuit as he continued to make hay for Warwickshire before finally calling it a day in September.

He was the last of England's legendary 2005 Ashes side to retire, but his eye-catching stroke play still endures, with Ollie Pope the latest to emerge under 'The Next Ian Bell' mantle. 

Bell returned to the England set-up earlier this year as a batting coach at the Under 19 World Cup, and it's hard to see him staying away from the game for too long.

Tim Bresnan

Tim Bresnan is still going strong at 35 after joining Warwickshire from Yorkshire

Tim Bresnan is still going strong at 35 after joining Warwickshire from Yorkshire

A tireless workhorse and the unlikeliest member of England's terrific bowling attack. Bresnan was drafted in for the fourth Test in Melbourne, replacing the erratic Steven Finn.

The Yorkshireman provided immediate control and went on to take 11 wickets in the final two Tests - including the wicket of Ben Hilfenhaus which secured England's retaining of the urn at the MCG.

Bresnan was a prominent member of the England set-up across all three formats, but earned his final Test cap in the debacle of the 2013-14 whitewash and his final ODI appearance came in a washout against Ireland in 2015, the day before coach Peter Moores was sacked.

He was a major casualty of the new direction of English cricket under Strauss and Trevor Bayliss, returning to the county circuit with Yorkshire. 

The 19-year association with his hometown county came to an end this year as he moved to Warwickshire in search of regular playing time, and at 35 he is still going strong.

Stuart Broad

Jimmy Anderson (right) and Stuart Broad are still leading England's bowling attack 10 years on

Jimmy Anderson (right) and Stuart Broad are still leading England's bowling attack 10 years on

A torn stomach muscle ended Broad's Ashes after just two Tests, where his highlight was being the victim of Peter Siddle's birthday hat-trick at The Gabba.

He was back in 2013 as public enemy No 1 after infuriating the Australians for refusing to walk despite clearly edging Ashton Agar to first slip just months earlier.

Broad has thrived on his rivalry with Australia, and it fuels him to keep going for next winter's trip down under. Still going alongside his close pal, Anderson, Broad is only improving with age, despite turning 34 this year.

He was man of the series against Pakistan in the summer as he claimed his 500th Test wicket, and his incredible form with the ball earned him a nomination for the BBC's Sports Personality of the Year. 

Talk of his demise at the start of the summer was greatly exaggerated. He's set to out last his partner in crime, Anderson, and don't bet against him eventually joining him in the 600 club, and maybe even surpassing him.

A future in the media awaits, if his performance in front of the camera when he was dropped for the first Test against West Indies in the summer is anything to go by, and he certainly to impress during his appearances in the Sky Sports commentary box. 

Paul Collingwood

Paul Collingwood retired in 2018 and has since become assistant to coach Chris Silverwood

Paul Collingwood retired in 2018 and has since become assistant to coach Chris Silverwood

The 2010-11 Ashes was the international swansong for Paul Collingwood MBE (let's not forget the 17 runs in the fifth Ashes Test in 2005 that earned him recognition from the Queen).

His playing days continued with Durham until 2018, when he finally called it a day at the ripe old age of 42.

Collingwood has since become ingrained in the England backroom set-up, and is now assistant to Chris Silverwood having first been drafted in as a fielding coach.

The Covid pandemic granted Collingwood the chance to deputise for Silverwood and take temporary charge of the ODI side against Ireland in July.

With Collingwood firmly entrenched in the coaching staff, could he make the jump to being Silverwood's successor in the future? If the tutorials on his coaching Instagram page are anything to go by then he's certainly in it for the long haul.

Steven Davies

Backup wicket keeper Steven Davies has not played for his country since 2011

Backup wicket keeper Steven Davies has not played for his country since 2011

The only player of England's Ashes-winning squad that never won a Test cap. Selected as back up to Matt Prior, Davies never got a look in behind the first-choice's exemplary consistency with bat and gloves.

Davies played the last of his eight ODIs for England in 2011, just weeks before he became the first male international cricketer to come out as gay.

Davies received support from senior figures throughout the game when he revealed his sexuality, and admitted he was bowled over by the reaction of his team-mates.

He said at the time: 'The difference is huge. I am so much happier. I told Andy Flower first. It was a tough thing for me to do, to tell him face-to-face, but I had to do it. He supported me 100 per cent, [both] him and Andrew Strauss. It was the right thing to do as I felt I couldn't live like this anymore. 

'I didn't enjoy going on tour too much because of the secret, and the Ashes was going to be a three-and-a-half-month tour. That's a long time and I would have really struggled to finish it. My sexuality is an essential part of who I am, so I wanted the boys to know.'

Davies, 34, left Surrey in 2016 and is now a regular for Somerset. 

Steven Finn

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