sport news Emma Raducanu breaks silence to reveal she 'felt dizzy' and was 'not well ...

sport news Emma Raducanu breaks silence to reveal she 'felt dizzy' and was 'not well ...
sport news Emma Raducanu breaks silence to reveal she 'felt dizzy' and was 'not well ...

Emma Raducanu has broken her silence after her dramatic exit from Wimbledon last night, revealing she 'started breathing heavily and felt sick' and thinks 'the whole experience caught up with me'.

The 18-year-old posted a heartwarming message on Twitter on Tuesday afternoon thanking the 'amazing crowd' for their support throughout the tournament and was 'sorry our match ended the way it did'.

She revealed bowing out of the fourth round 'felt like the hardest thing to do' and her medical team advised her to retire - but vowed to 'come back stronger'.

It comes after her former coach said she will put her Wimbledon disappointment behind and bounce back stronger than ever.

Clint Harris, who watched yesterday's match with her family, told MailOnline the setback was merely a 'side-step' and she would learn from it.

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Meanwhile her father said last night he and 'many people' were 'proud' of the young ace after she was forced to bow out of Wimbledon following a suspected 'panic attack' and 'breathing difficulties'.

Mr Raducanu, who along with Emma's mother, Renee, appeared visibly disappointed as he watched from the stands and said: 'I think it's the level.'

The 18-year-old star's fairy-tale run came to an end when she retired mid-match during the second set of her Wimbledon clash with Australia's Ajla Tomljanovic.

It was later revealed the Bromley teenager had suffered issues with her breathing during the match. But her father, Ian Raducanu, later suggested that the competitiveness of the tournament may have been in a factor.

Emma Raducanu has broken her silence after her dramatic exit from Wimbledon last night, revealing she 'started breathing heavily and felt sick' and thinks 'the whole experience caught up with me'

Emma Raducanu has broken her silence after her dramatic exit from Wimbledon last night, revealing she 'started breathing heavily and felt sick' and thinks 'the whole experience caught up with me'

Raducanu tweeted today: 'Hi guys, I wanted to let everyone know that I'm feeling much better this morning. First up I want to congratulate Ajla on an incredible performance and I'm sorry our match ended the way it did.

'I was playing the best tennis of my life in front of an amazing crowd this week and I think the whole experience caught up with me. At the end of the first set, after some super intense rallies, I started to breathe heavily and felt dizzy.

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'The medical team advised me not to continue and, although it felt like the hardest thing in the world not to be able to finish my Wimbledon on the court, I was not well enough to carry on.

'I want to thank the people who have cheered me on every single match, I wanted to win so badly for you! I also want to thank the All England CLub, my team, the LTA, my parents and friends.

'Last night will go a long way to helping me learn what it takes to perform at the top. I will cherish everything we have achieved together this week and come back stronger. Can't wait to see what's next on my journey.'

Mr Harris, head of tennis at the Bromley Tennis Centre, who coached Raducanu for a year of her remarkable rise, said he and her family are confident she would overcome this hurdle and rise above the current furore.

He told MailOnline: 'Emma's aware that in professional sport there will be times when you encounter things that are unexpected and uncomfortable and it's how you deal with them.

'I think this was a 'sideways step' and she will come back stronger.'

Mr Harris, who had watched the last 16 game with her parents, said: 'Both Ian and and Renee were disappointed with what happened last night but disappointed for her more than anything because they know how hard she worked to go on this amazing run.

'But talking to her father at Wimbledon last night, he was confident that she would bounce back.'

Ranked 338th in the world at the start of the tournament, Raducanu, who only recently completed her A-level exams, exceeded expectations as she became the youngest British female to make it into the second week at Wimbledon since Christine Truman in 1959.

Yet Mr Harris said she would have been 'desperately keen' to carry on her second set if she could have done so.

He said he did not believe pressure was a major factor in her pulling out but did concede that her big tournament inexperience and fatigue may have played a part.

Ian Raducanu appeared disappointed as his daughter was forced to quit Wimbledon  due to breathing difficulties yesterday

The 18-year-old star's fairy-tale run came to an end last night when she quit mid-match during the second set of her Wimbledon clash with Australia's Ajla Tomljanovic

Ian Raducanu (pictured left), the father of teenage tennis star Emma Raducanu (pictured right), said the competitive 'level' of Wimbledon may have led to the young ace's shock retirement through 'breathing difficulties' - but said the nation remained 'proud of her'.

The 18-year-old star's fairy-tale run came to an end last night when she quit mid-match during the second set of her Wimbledon clash with Australia's Ajla Tomljanovic

The 18-year-old star's fairy-tale run came to an end last night when she quit mid-match during the second set of her Wimbledon clash with Australia's Ajla Tomljanovic

British tennis sensation Emma Raducanu was forced to retire during the second set of her Wimbledon clash with Australia's Ajla Tomljanovic due to 'difficulty breathing'

British tennis sensation Emma Raducanu was forced to retire during the second set of her Wimbledon clash with Australia's Ajla Tomljanovic due to 'difficulty breathing'

Emma Raducanu receiving medical treatment during her fourth round match at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships

Emma Raducanu receiving medical treatment during her fourth round match at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships

How Emma Raducanu became the Youngest British girl in the last 16 since Christine Truman in 1959 

Emma Raducanu is the youngest British female to make it into the second week at Wimbledon for more than 60 years.

Christine Truman reached the fourth round in 1959 aged 18 years and five months – two months younger than Emma. Remarkably, two years earlier Truman made it to the semi-finals aged 16 in her debut in SW19 in 1957.

Truman's success was all the more impressive given that since birth she was partially blind in her left eye – a fact her family had kept secret from competitors in her early days.

Asked whether her daughter's sight had contributed to her disappointing performance at Wimbledon in 1962 when she was knocked out in the third round, her mother told a newspaper: 'It is nonsense to suggest that Christine's eyesight has affected her tennis in any way. It was exactly the same when she was on top of her form.'

In a career spanning more than two decades, Truman, an unpredictable player whose form could soar one week and crash the next, won titles in France and Italy and was later a finalist at both Wimbledon and the US Open. She had another successful Wimbledon run in 1965 when – unseeded and all but written off by observers – she made it to the semi-final. Continuing to play at domestic tournaments throughout her career, she was Martina Navratilova's first opponent at Wimbledon in 1973.

She married former Wasps rugby player Gerry Janes, and the pair had four children, one of whom – Amanda Keen – went on to become a professional tennis player who twice played at Wimbledon and had a career-best ranking of number 207. Mrs Truman Janes retired from tennis in 1975 and became a commentator for BBC radio.

She was awarded an MBE in the 2001 Queen's Birthday's Honours list for her services to sport. She has also published several children's books including her first, Dilly And Other Poems, about a loveable doll which finds itself in different situations, such as – unsurprisingly – learning to play tennis.

Even though she stopped playing tennis competitively many years ago, Mrs Truman Janes still takes to the court at her local clubs in Aldeburgh and Thorpeness, Suffolk. She told her local newspaper: 'It exercises all the muscles and it is something you can keep doing into old age.' Meanwhile, Britain's men's No 2 Cameron Norrie – the last British star in the men's singles after Andy Murray crashed out of the tournament on Friday – lost his match against Roger Federer yesterday.

Norrie, 25, put up a valiant effort against the eight-time champion but was beaten in four sets. The player stopped during the match to give a memento of his official Wimbledon towel to a young spectator who had been hit by a tennis ball. It was the third consecutive Grand Slam event where Norrie had reached the last 32, losing to Rafael Nadal at both the Australian and French Opens prior to his defeat to Swiss veteran Federer yesterday.

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He said: 'Her stamina and agility are second to none and she would have been mortified to have to throw the towel in but it's a decision she would've taken with her team.

'I texted Ian this morning and asked how things were. He's a guy who keeps things close to his chest and all he said was 'everything's ok, she's fine.

'Personally I don't think it was that she couldn't handle the pressure, she's extremely tough mentally as well as physically.

'But she did look a little pale when she came on to court, she did appear to be off-colour from where I was sitting.

'You have to remember, though, that yesterday was the third top-50 player she has played in succession and to maintain that level of tennis both physically and mentally is exhausting. And she isn't used to that yet.

'Also there was a big delay in when her match was due to start. We thought she'd be on about 4.30pm but it wasn't until 8pm that she got started. That's a lot of time and the anxiety grows and grows.

'What does she do nutrition-wise in that time? Does she have a snack, does she have a larger meal? These are all decisions that she hasn't had to make yet at this level.

'Was it indigestion? I can't say for sure, it would be totally speculative. She was hyperventilating at one point and also holding her stomach so it could have also been an abdominal muscle strain or tear but I'm not convinced of that to be honest.'

MailOnline revealed yesterday how Raducanu and her father, who works in finance, would often play tennis in the quiet cul-de-sac outside their home in the leafy South London suburb of Bromley.

They were seen by neighbours knocking balls back and forth during lockdown to keep her concentration levels up for Wimbledon.

Paying tribute to her parents, Mr Harris said: 'Her father doesn't play tennis but his depth of knowledge of the sport is incredible and I think Emma has inherited her parents intellect, which has enabled her to keep in perspective what is going on around her.

'When Emma was training here, Ian would actually be courtside and that's something I'd actively encourage. He wanted to understand the psychology, the technical development it takes to play tennis at this level.

'That's why he goes out into their cul-de-sac with her to knock some balls about. There isn't anything he can really do technically but he knows that by having a few rallies with her it helps maintain her eye and hand co-ordination.

'Both Ian and Renee have devoted so much to their daughter's career and they've been key to keeping her grounded and aware of the pitfalls that professional sport at the highest level can bring.

'What happens to Emma from now on? Who knows. But this is a great step. You don't get to where Emma is at the moment overnight, she's been playing since she was six-years-old and has honed her raw talent with hours and hours of hard work and determination. We are all fully behind her.'

There was no reply at Raducanu's semi-detached home today, although neighbour Dave Moore, 74, added: 'It was such a shame about how she went out the way she did but she can hold her head up high. She's done everyone in the cul-de-sac proud.'

Mr Raducanu, who along with Emma's mother, Renee, appeared visibly disappointed as he watched from the stands yesterday, told the Telegraph: 'I think it's the level.'

The father did not clarify if he meant mental or physical, though when asked if it was nerves, he replied: 'Who knows?' But he said he was 'proud, as many people are' of his daughter's Wimbledon run.

Mr Raducanu said he was 'proud' of his daughter's Wimbledon run, 'as many Britons are,' he added

Mr Raducanu said he was 'proud' of his daughter's Wimbledon run, 'as many Britons are,' he added

Supporters back in Emma Raducanu's home town of Bromley share their 'pride' is young star after her Wimbledon exit 

Neighbours of the Raducanu family yesterday expressed their pride in the teenage tennis ace after she was forced to retire from Wimbledon last night.

The 18-year-old lives with her parents in a quiet cul-de-sac in Bromley, Kent. 

Full-time mum Michelle Derham, 29, said she hoped Raducanu would get even further than the fourth round at

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