sport news FA Cup and Women's Super League lined up for sin-bin trials after IFAB approve ... trends now

sport news FA Cup and Women's Super League lined up for sin-bin trials after IFAB approve ... trends now
sport news FA Cup and Women's Super League lined up for sin-bin trials after IFAB approve ... trends now

sport news FA Cup and Women's Super League lined up for sin-bin trials after IFAB approve ... trends now

Sin-bins for tactical fouls and dissent could trialled in the FA Cup and Women's Super League after the International FA Board [IFAB] approved experiments in the professional game at a meeting in London.

FA chief executive Mark Bullingham indicated that their competitions could be used for the trials, which may also see football adopt the rugby convention that only a captain can talk to referees in an attempt to improve player behaviour.

The proposed introduction of 10-minute sin-bins is also an attempt to tackle dissent, which has increased in the Premier League this season, as well as clamping down on so-called tactical fouls. 

One example of foul deemed worthy of sin-bin discussed by IFAB yesterday was Italy defender Giorgio Chiellini's shirt tug on Bukayo Saka during England's Euro 2020 final defeat to Italy, which was only punished by a yellow card.

Sin-bins were trialled at grassroots level in England during the 2019-20 season, with offenders sent off for 10 minutes as well as receiving a yellow card.

Sin-bins for tactical fouls and dissent could trialled in the FA Cup by the Football Association

Sin-bins for tactical fouls and dissent could trialled in the FA Cup by the Football Association

The FA have indicated that the Women's Super League could also be used in the trials

The FA have indicated that the Women's Super League could also be used in the trials

Sin bins are set to be trialled in professional football in a bid to stamp out abuse of referees. Pictured: Brighton's Lewis Dunk is shown a red card for dissent by Anthony Taylor

Sin bins are set to be trialled in professional football in a bid to stamp out abuse of referees. Pictured: Brighton's Lewis Dunk is shown a red card for dissent by Anthony Taylor

Mail Sport has launched a campaign to stop the abuse of referees to help boost the game

Mail Sport has launched a campaign to stop the abuse of referees to help boost the game

'The areas we were looking at were dissent, where it's worked very, very well in the grassroots game in England,' Bullingham said. 

'We've also spoken about other areas, particularly tactical fouls. I think we've got to look at the protocol when it comes out and then work out what league it's most appropriate to trial it in.'

During IFAB's Annual Business Meeting at the five-star Sofitel Hotel near Heathrow, it was agreed that team captains will be able to approach the referee in 'certain major situations'. 

The new proposals come in the wake of Mail Sport's campaign to kick out the mistreatment of officials in football, sparked by the harrowing accounts of abuse shared by grassroots referees on the It's All Kicking off podcast.

Ten-minute sin bins will be trialled 'for dissent and specific tactical offences' after being successfully implemented within grassroots football.

Sin bins have been hugely popular since their introduction into grassroots and junior football in England in 2019, with players who display words or actions of dissent forced to leave the pitch for 10 minutes of the match.

The successful trial of match officials wearing body cameras at grassroots level was also discussed during the meeting in London - and football's lawmakers will

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