Twitter could soon let users hide unwanted replies to their tweets

Twitter could soon let users hide unwanted replies to their tweets in a bid to promote 'healthy' conversation on the platform The 'Hide Tweets' feature would remove unwanted replies in a conversation Users can still view all replies by clicking the 'View Hidden Tweets' option Twitter employee confirmed it's developing the tool and will publicly test it soon It comes as CEO Jack Dorsey has been trying to promote 'healthy' discourse 

By Annie Palmer For Dailymail.com

Published: 16:43 GMT, 1 March 2019 | Updated: 16:46 GMT, 1 March 2019

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Twitter is giving users greater control over how conversations develop around their tweets.

The social media giant confirmed it's testing a new 'Hide Tweet' feature that hides replies from other users, instead of blocking or muting them. 

The tool was first spotted in the code of Twitter's Android application by software engineer

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Twitter is giving users greater control over how conversations develop around their tweets. The firm is testing a 'Hide Tweets' feature that would hide replies from users

Twitter is giving users greater control over how conversations develop around their tweets. The firm is testing a 'Hide Tweets' feature that would hide replies from users

, a senior product manager at Twitter, later confirmed that the company is developing the tool. 

Screenshots show that users can access the tool by clicking on the menu button in a tweet. 

From there, they'd select the 'Hide Tweet' button.  

It doesn't mean the reply is permanently hidden, however. Users can view all replies in a conversation by clicking the 'View Hidden Tweets' button. 

Haq said the feature, which will be publicly tested in the next few months, will give users more tools to moderate their own conversations. 

'People who start interesting conversations on Twitter are really important to us, and we want to empower them to make the conversations they start as healthy as possible by giving them some control,' Haq wrote in a tweet. 

The tool was first spotted in the code of Twitter's Android application by software engineer Jane Manchun Wong. A Twitter product manager later confirmed it was testing the feature

The tool was first spotted in the code of Twitter's Android application by software engineer Jane Manchun Wong. A Twitter product manager later confirmed it was testing the feature

'...We already see people trying

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