Fossilized ankle bone from human ancestor that lived 4.5 million years ago

Fossilized ankle bone from human ancestor that lived 4.5 million years ago suggests they walked upright far more often than previously thought Researchers studied ankle and big toe bone from hominin Ardipithecus ramidus Evidence of cartilage suggest they used their big toe similarly to how humans do The findings suggest the function of the foot leaned toward upright walking  These human ancestors were 'lousy bipeds,' though, and also climbed trees 

By Cheyenne Macdonald For Dailymail.com

Published: 19:34 GMT, 1 March 2019 | Updated: 19:34 GMT, 1 March 2019

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Fossilized bones discovered in Africa more than a decade ago may now point to a ‘pivotal’ moment in the timeline of human evolution.

A new analysis on the 4.5 million-year-old partial skeleton of a female hominin has revealed a glimpse into the anatomical details of locomotion in the human ancestor, Ardipithecus ramidus.

And, researchers now say this group may have been more adept at upright walking than previously suspected.

The remains reveal adaptations in bones from the ankle and big toe that support bipedalism, or the ability to walk on two feet, though the experts say their gait was likely far from perfect.

A new analysis on the 4.5 million-year-old partial skeleton of a female hominin has revealed a glimpse into the anatomical details of locomotion in the human ancestor, Ardipithecus ramidus. A fossil talus (a bone in the ankle) is shown

A new analysis on the 4.5 million-year-old partial skeleton of a female hominin has revealed a glimpse into the anatomical details of locomotion in the human ancestor, Ardipithecus ramidus. A fossil talus (a bone in the ankle) is shown

‘Our research shows that while Ardipithecus was a lousy biped, she was somewhat better than we thought before,’ said Scott W. Simpson, PhD, from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

‘The fact that Ardipithecus could both walk upright, albeit imperfectly, and scurry in trees marks it out as a pivotal transitional figure in our human lineage.’

In the new analysis published in the Journal of Human Evolution, the researcher helps to paint a clearer picture of the hip, ankle, and foot function in Ardipithecus locomotion.

While previous research suggested the human ancestor was capable of bipedalism, to what extent largely remained unclear.

Simpson’s team studied fossils found in the Gona Project Study area in Ethiopia, where continuous field research has been underway since 1999 to investigate the human lineage spanning the last 6.3 million years.

In the new analysis published in the Journal of Human Evolution, the researcher helps to paint a clearer picture of the hip, ankle, and foot function in Ardipithecus locomotion.

In the new analysis published in the Journal of Human Evolution, the researcher helps to paint a clearer picture of the hip,

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