How WOLVES can co-operate with humans just like dogs

How WOLVES can co-operate with humans just like dogs: Ferocious canines are as capable of following handler's commands - but they show more initiative than domesticated pets Behaviours that make a dog cooperative is due to their wild and 'wolf-like' nature Study used dogs and wolves both bred under human socialisation conditions Wolves were more likely to initiate cooperation with humans and lead tasks Dogs were more likely to wait for humans to make the first move and then follow  

By Yuan Ren For Mailonline

Published: 10:41 GMT, 15 March 2019 | Updated: 12:07 GMT, 15 March 2019

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Wolves reared by humans can learn to cooperate with their handlers just as well as domesticated dogs, a new study has found.

Wild wolves work together to hunt, rear their offspring and defend their territory, traits which have been passed down to modern dogs - their closest relatives.

Experts tested the extent to which dogs and grey wolves collaborate with humans in order to solve a range of tasks.

They found that both dogs and wolves cooperate intensively and equally successfully, but wolves show more initiative where dogs follow a human's lead. 

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Wolves are dogs' closest undomesticated relative but have a more aggressive image due to their 'wild' nature. But scientists have shown that the theory dogs cooperate better with humans than wolves because of domestication may be nothing but a myth

Wolves are dogs' closest undomesticated relative but have a more aggressive image due to their 'wild' nature. But scientists have shown that the theory dogs cooperate better with humans than wolves because of domestication may be nothing but a myth

The experiment, conducted at the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, looked at how wolves and dogs cooperated with humans to solve specific tests. 

The study tested 15 young grey wolves, aged from two to eight years old, and 12 mixed-breed dogs, from two to seven years old, at the Wolf Science Center in Austria. 

All the animals in the study had been raised in similar conditions and had been exposed to humans early in their lives.  

In a written statement Dr Friederike Range, who led the study, said: 'The detailed analysis of the

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