Mythical 'Sunken Kingdom' of Wales rises again

Mythical 'Sunken Kingdom' of Wales rises again: Storm Hannah unearths petrified prehistoric forest that inspired ancient legend of the Lost Hundred after thousands of years buried on a Welsh beach The forest of Borth used to stretch for two to three miles along the Welsh shore  Buried under layers of peat, sand and saltwater around 4,000 - 6,000 years ago It has been revealed after low tides and a storm revealed the tree stumps 

By Joe Pinkstone For Mailonline

Published: 12:20 BST, 22 May 2019 | Updated: 12:50 BST, 22 May 2019

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A prehistoric forest which was buried under water and sand more than 4,500 years ago and inspired a local legend has been uncovered on a Welsh beach. 

The forest of Borth used to stretch for up to three miles along the shore between Ynys-las and Borth and eventually was buried under layers of peat, sand and saltwater.

The skeletal trees under Borth's beach led to the local legend of the mythical Sunken Kingdom of Wales, called Cantre'r Gwaelod.

Folklore says the forest drowned beneath the waves but it has now been revealed by low tides and high winds from Storm Hannah.  

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A prehistoric forest of hundreds of trees which died more than 4,500 years ago has been uncovered on a Welsh beach after low tides and a storm

 A prehistoric forest of hundreds of trees which died more than 4,500 years ago has been uncovered on a Welsh beach after low tides and a storm

In 2014, shin-high stumps were visible for the first time, but locals said they were soon mostly recovered by sand. 

A storm this week combined with the low tide to expose the Bronze Age forest to curious passer-bys.  

Thick trunks and sprawling roots were seen in their entirety for the first time in thousands of years.

Locals said they think it is the most of the forest to be revealed in living memory as Storm Hannah dug out the roots which were revealed by a lower than usual tide.

Amateur photographer Wayne Lewis, 38, from Welshpool was walking on the beach when he spotted the uncovered forest.

Experts have found the submerged forest contains pine, alder, oak and birch. 

It is understood the trees stopped growing between 4,500 and 6,000 years ago, as the water level rose and a thick blanket of peat formed.

Archaeologists knew the Bronze Age forest existed on the beach because small stumps were sometimes visible along parts of it at low tide. In 2014, shin-high stumps were visible for the first time, but locals said they were soon mostly recovered by sand

Archaeologists knew the Bronze Age forest existed on the beach because small stumps were sometimes visible along parts of it at low tide. In 2014, shin-high stumps were visible for the first time, but

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