Apple's $5 billion 'spaceship campus' designed to be able to withstand ...

Apple's $5 billion 'spaceship campus' is specially designed to survive even the worst of California's earthquakes, exec reveals Apple Park sits on 692 steel saucers to prevent damage during an earthquake It uses base-isolation tech, so that the structure isn't attached to the ground Jony Ive, Apple's design chief, told the New York Times that he and co-founder Steve Jobs thought extensively about how to protect the campus from tremors 

By Annie Palmer For Dailymail.com

Published: 23:43 BST, 4 June 2019 | Updated: 23:43 BST, 4 June 2019

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Apple Park, the tech giant's futuristic campus, is a design feat in and of itself due to its 'spaceship'-like shape. 

But the spaceship campus' circular structure isn't the only otherworldly thing about it, as the building reportedly doesn't even rest on the Earth's surface. 

Jony Ive, Apple's chief design officer, told the New York Times that in order to make sure the building was fully protected from California's notorious earthquakes, it rests on 692 steel saucers. 

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The spaceship structure of Apple Park, the tech giant's futuristic campus, isn't the only otherworldly thing about it, as the building reportedly doesn't even rest on the Earth's surface

The spaceship structure of Apple Park, the tech giant's futuristic campus, isn't the only otherworldly thing about it, as the building reportedly doesn't even rest on the Earth's surface

It relies on a type of engineering called base-isolation technology, which enables a building to be able to withstand potentially catastrophic tremors from earthquakes. 

The saucers are located two stories beneath where Apple employees are busy toiling away on the latest iPhone or Mac computer. 

During an earthquake, the building slides back and forth on the saucer, moving as much as four feet in either direction, according to the Times.  

Ive told the Times that the company put a lot of thought into how Apple Park could be protected from earthquakes. 

He and Steve Jobs, Apple's late co-founder, determined base-isolation technology would be implemented in the company's new headquarters. 

Jobs was inspired by Japanese building design, where base-isolation technology is utilized more often, Ive told the Times. 

Apple employees have revealed stunning new images of the firm's $5 billion (£3.5 billion) 'spaceship campus' in California. The behind-the scenes photos reveal the site's enormous curved glass walls up close. The glass used on the campus and seen in this image is 'the largest piece of curved glass in the world', according to the company's chief designer Jony Ive

A behind-the-scenes photo reveals Apple Park's enormous curved glass walls up close. The glass used on the campus and seen in this image is 'the largest piece of curved glass in the world', according to the company's chief designer Jony Ive

Apple said it will take six months to move all 12,000 staff into the $5 billion (£4 billion) 2.8 million-square-foot campus, which features a 1,000 seat auditorium named the Steve Jobs Theatre

Ive told the Times that the company put a lot of thought into how Apple Park could be protected from earthquakes. He and Steve Jobs determined base-isolation tech would work 

Apple finished construction of Apple Park in 2018 and the project is estimated to have cost roughly $5 billion to complete. 

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