Huge mammoth tooth found next to a broken flowerpot in Devon

Retired couple find one of the 'biggest EVER mammoth teeth' weighing 12lbs and measuring 15 inches long as they moved in to their Devon cottage Stephen and Stella Huyshe-Shires found the item last November in their garden  They were moving into a cottage in Devon and found it near a broken flower pot  Unaware of its true history until they attended a museum event on mammoths  Saw several other mammoth teeth on display and realised what they actually had

By Joe Pinkstone For Mailonline

Published: 14:43 BST, 25 June 2019 | Updated: 15:29 BST, 25 June 2019

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An enormous mammoth tooth has been accidentally discovered next to a broken plant pot in a Devon garden. 

The monster molar weighs 12lbs (5.5kg) and measures 15 inches (38cm) long  was found by the new owners of a cottage in the English countryside. 

Stephen and Stella Huyshe-Shires found the item last November and were unaware of its true origin.

They only discovered their quirky find was actually a fossilised tooth when they spotted another mammoth relic on display at Sidmouth museum.

Experts say it is much larger than most mammoth teeth and could be one of the biggest ever discovered.  

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The monster molar weighs 12lbs (5.5kg) and was found by the new owners of a cottage in the English countryside. It is undergoing further tests and believed to be the largest and rearmost tooth of an adult mammoth

 The monster molar weighs 12lbs (5.5kg) and was found by the new owners of a cottage in the English countryside. It is undergoing further tests and believed to be the largest and rearmost tooth of an adult mammoth 

A mammoth expert at the Natural History Museum told MailOnline the largest tooth known to them weighed weighs nearly 18lbs (8 kg).

Professor Adrian Lister said: 'This is a lower last (back) molar of a woolly mammoth, and the back ones were the biggest. 

'Similar teeth in our collection weigh between 3-7 kg (6.6lbs - 15.5lbs), the largest I could find is one collected in Shepperton (Surrey) in 1954 that weighs nearly 8 kg 17.6lbs). 

'However, the molar found in Sidbury had already worn down somewhat through feeding in life, so would likely have weighed more (perhaps up to 7 kg (15.3lbs)) originally.' 

Mrs Huyshe-Shires said the tooth looked like a broken ornament on first inspection.

Her husband added: 'One of the slides at the lecture was of a mammoth tooth and we said 'we have one of those'.

'What we didn't have was a sense of scale from that slide we had no idea of how big it was.

'We came down to the museum and said 'we think we have got one' and they showed us some of their collection and we thought 'these are quite small maybe it isn't a mammoth tooth'.

'It's quite unbelievable really. You wait 10,000 years for a mammoth tooth and then two come along together.'

The new discovery weighs more than double the largest teeth in Sidmouth museum's collection, which tip the scales at 5.5lbs (2.5kg).

The origin of how the tooth was discovered before it ended up the the garden remains a mystery and Sidmouth Museum is trying to track down when and where it was found.

Stephen and Stella Huyshe-Shires (pictured) found the 12lbs (5.5kg) tooth in November and were unaware of its true origin. They only discovered their quirky find was actually a fossilised tooth when they spotted another mammoth tooth on display at Sidmouth museum

Stephen and Stella Huyshe-Shires (pictured) found the 12lbs (5.5kg) tooth in November and were unaware of its true origin. They only discovered their quirky find was actually a fossilised tooth when they spotted another mammoth tooth on display at Sidmouth museum

Mrs Huyshe-Shires said the tooth looked like a broken ornament on first inspection. The ormous mammoth tooth has been accidentally discovered next to a broken plant pot in a Devon garden

Mrs Huyshe-Shires said the tooth looked like a broken ornament on first inspection. The ormous mammoth tooth has

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