Rise in black vultures driven by climate change is putting livestock and even ...

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Why vultures are eating animals ALIVE in Kentucky: Rise in scavenging birds driven by climate change is putting livestock and even small pets at risk Black vultures have descended on cattle in some U.S. states, farmers are saying The predatory birds are being driven by climate change and warmer temps  Vultures tend to prey on weaker livestock like calves when not scavenging The influx is leading to losses by farmers who struggle to control the birds As the vulture spreads, however, other birds are imperiled by climate change 

By James Pero For Dailymail.com

Published: 17:29 BST, 1 July 2019 | Updated: 17:46 BST, 1 July 2019

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Vultures aided by climate change and protected through a federal conservation law are descending on cattle in Kentucky, say farmers. 

Farmers further north than what has traditionally been considered black vulture territory are reporting an influx of the birds which, according to scientists, is attributable to warmer winter temperatures.

As reported by the Cornell Chronicle, black vultures have spread further North, wintering as far as Massachusetts where minimum temperatures are now similar to their traditional habitats. 

Black vultures are descending on cattle in areas farther north than farmers are accustomed to. Scientists say it could be fueled by climate change. File photo

Black vultures are descending on cattle in areas farther north than farmers are accustomed to. Scientists say it could be fueled by climate change. File photo

WHAT IS THE BLACK VULTURE? 

Black Vultures have black plumage, a bare black head, and neat white plumes under their wingtips. 

The predatory birds feed on carcasses but also live newborn calves, lambs, goats, piglets and will occasionally attempt to feed on the adults of those livestock. 

In Kentucky, an influx of vultures has lead to widespread losses of cattle.

The increased population may be linked to climate change as warmer winter temperatures affect the birds' range and habits.

In a recent report from the Louisville Courier Journal, farmers say the increasingly abundant bird has contributed to a

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