How should humanity respond to first contact from extra-terrestrials'?

How should humanity respond to first contact from extra-terrestrials? UK alien hunters to ask the public in the largest ever survey of its kind  A survey has been launched which will ask the public how we should respond  The views they will gather will help shape plans for an international protocol  Scientists send probes to planets in the solar system to search for alien life  SETI's Breakthrough Listen project uses antennas to try and pick up signals  But there is no procedure enshrined in international law on how to respond to a signal from an alien civilisation

By Victoria Bell For Mailonline

Published: 18:07 BST, 1 July 2019 | Updated: 18:11 BST, 1 July 2019

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Scientists have decided that a huge public survey should be conducted on how we should respond should we be contacted by aliens. 

Members of the UK Seti Research Network (UKSRN) are to launch what is believed to be the largest ever survey of public attitudes towards alien contact today.

The views they will gather, taken at the Royal Society's summer science exhibition, will help them shape plans for an international protocol.

They will set the ground rules on how organisations should share news of any signals that are detected; what sense can be made of them; and how humans might reply.

Although scientists send probes to planets in the solar system to search for alien life there is no procedure in place in the event that aliens attempt contact with Earth. 

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Scientists have decided that a huge public survey should be conducted on how we should respond should we be contacted by aliens (stock image)

Scientists have decided that a huge public survey should be conducted on how we should respond should we be contacted by aliens (stock image) 

WHAT IS SETI'S BREAKTHROUGH LISTEN INITIATIVE?

Breakthrough Listen is a privately funded, decade-long research project based at the University of California, Berkeley.

It has just announced a significant number of new observations. 

They examined roughly 1,300 nearby stars using large antennas in West Virginia and Australia.

For each of these star systems, they sifted through several billion radio channels, looking for a signal of the type that only a radio transmitter can produce. 

No extraterrestrial radio emissions were detected.

But those 1,300 stars represent only a minuscule sample of the

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