Ocean cleanup effort drags 5-TON 'ghost net' from the Pacific Ocean Garbage ...

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A non-profit organization has scraped more than 40 tons of fishing nets and consumer plastics from a region of the Pacific Ocean that’s home to a massive debris field known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.

The haul includes everything from beer bottles and children’s toys to enormous ‘ghost nets’ – the abandoned fishing gear that can drift at sea for decades, trapping more garbage and marine wildlife in its path.

After a 25-day clean-up mission, Ocean Voyages says it captured thousands of pounds of plastic waste, including a five-ton ghost net.

The group plans to return next year to continue work at the site over a three-month period.

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A non-profit organization has scraped more than 40 tons of fishing nets and consumer plastics from a region of the Pacific Ocean, including a 5-ton 'ghost net'

A massive ghost net was pulled from the Pacific along with 40 tons of waste

A non-profit organization has scraped more than 40 tons of fishing nets and consumer plastics from a region of the Pacific Ocean, including a 5-ton 'ghost net'

Ocean Voyages conducted drone surveys in the Pacific Subtropical Convergence Zone – also known as the Pacific Gyre - between California and Hawaii to assess the debris ahead of recovery.

The team also recruited yachts and ships to tag ghost nets with satellite trackers.

‘Satellite technology played a key role in our recovery effort, offering an innovative solution to finding areas of dense plastic pollution,’ said Mary Crowley, Founder and Executive Director of OV Institute.

‘The nets and other debris are signs of the proliferating plastic pollution that poses threats to marine life, coastal environments, shipping, fisheries, wildlife and our health.’

After a 25-day clean-up mission, Ocean Voyages says it captured thousands of pounds of plastic waste, including a five-ton ghost net. The group plans to return next year to continue work at the site over a three-month period

After a 25-day clean-up mission, Ocean Voyages says it captured thousands of pounds of plastic waste, including a five-ton ghost net. The group plans to return next year to continue work at the site over a three-month period

The haul includes everything from beer bottles and children’s toys to enormous ‘ghost nets’ – the abandoned fishing gear that can drift at sea for decades, trapping more garbage and marine wildlife in its path

The haul includes everything from beer bottles and children’s toys to enormous ‘ghost nets’ – the abandoned fishing gear that can drift at sea for decades, trapping more garbage and marine wildlife in its path

The clean-up relied on the sailing cargo ship, S/V KWAI and the plastic survey vessel AVEIA.

Following this year’s success, the group now says it’s planning to return in 2020 to tackle even more ocean garbage, this time with an additional vessel equipped with specially-adapted fishing gear to scoop up plastic.

According to OV Institute, roughly  600,000 tons of abandoned gear ends up in the oceans each year. 

And, about 380,000 marine animals are killed every year as a result.   

‘It is very disturbing to be sailing through what was only decades ago a pristine ocean wilderness and find it filled with our all-too-familiar garbage,’ Crowley says.

‘Satellite technology played a key role in our recovery effort, offering an innovative solution to finding areas of dense plastic pollution,’ said Mary Crowley, Founder and Executive Director of OV Institute

sonos sonos One (Gen 2) - Voice Controlled Smart Speaker with Amazon Alexa Built-in - Black read more

Ocean Voyages conducted drone surveys in the Pacific Subtropical Convergence Zone – also known as the Pacific Gyre - between California and Hawaii to assess the debris ahead of recovery. The team also recruited yachts and ships to tag ghost nets with satellite trackers

‘Satellite technology played a key role in

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