Rare Apollo 11 footage reveals an unseen look at the three astronauts on 50th ...

Never seen before footage of the Apollo 11 moon landing has been released to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the historic mission. 

It reveals the quarantine environment the astronauts were forced to sit through after returning to Earth as scientists tried to ensure they did not carry alien pathogens back form the moon. 

A modified gulf-stream trailer carried them to the multi-million dollar facility and the space rocks from the lunar surface were placed in an enclosure with lab mice to test if they were safe and the astronauts free of contamination. 

Experiments found the moon devoid of any harmful life and the Apollo 11 heroes eventually free to start a tour of celebration around the US and then the rest of the world. 

The footage, remastered as part of an upcoming Discovery Channel documentary called Apollo: The Forgotten Films, which is narrated by Apollo astronauts - including Apollo 11's own Michael Collins.  

July 20 2019 marks the 50th anniversary of when the human race achieved one of the most incredible feats of all time - venturing outside of our planet and two humans walking on the moon. 

The immortal footsteps of commander Neil Armstrong were inscribed into history when the whole world watch as he and Buzz Aldrin venture on to the lunar surface, placing the first indelible human mark on another world.  

'One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind' became arguably one of the most iconic phrases of the 21st century and the words reverberated around the planet after the Apollo 11 astronauts touched down safely in the 'Eagle' lander. 

America and the rest of the world has been marking the anniversary with a range of events and accolades, and MailOnline takes a look at the history of the Apollo programme and how it permanently shaped the world. 

Not only did the US succeed in beating arch-rivals the USSR to the moon but the space race of the 60s would lay the foundations for a half century of innovation and breakthroughs in a plethora of fields.   

The work done as part of the Apollo programme inspired a generation of people, who now lead the modern-day space race renaissance, with billionaires rushing to return to the moon and crafting plans to venture even further. 

The immortal footsteps of commander Neil Armstrong were inscribed into history when the whole world watch as he and Buzz Aldrin venture on to the lunar surface, placing the first indelible human mark on another world

The immortal footsteps of commander Neil Armstrong were inscribed into history when the whole world watch as he and Buzz Aldrin venture on to the lunar surface, placing the first indelible human mark on another world

APOLLO 11 FACTFILE 

Launch: 9.31am EDT (2.32pm BST), 16 July, 1969

Rocket - Saturn V, comprised of:

Columbia command module Service module  Lunar lander dubbed 'Eagle'

Distance travelled: 450,000mile round-trip

Main touchdown: 10.17pm EDT (3.56am BST)

Time on moon: 21.5hours

Splashdown on Earth: 12.50pm EDT (5.50pm BST) around 900 miles south west of Hawaii in the North Pacific Ocean   

The infatuation with being the first nation to land a human being on the moon was born out of traditional rivalry between two global superpowers - the US and the USSR - as Cold War tensions mounted.

Soviet Russia took an early lead in the race, being the first to send a satellite and a human into space, forever etched in to the memory and history books in the form of Sputnik and Yuri Gargarin. 

America's Mercury programme was accelerated to keep pace with the surging Soviets and their Vostok success. 

But the race was in its infancy, with the technology that saw the first man in space far from sufficient to safely land on the moon and return home. 

Soviet Russia continued to set the bar for space success until 1965, when the launch of the Gemini programme saw NASA pick up momentum and overtake their intercontinental nemesis. 

The Lunar Roving Vehicle is driven by astronaut John Young during the first Apollo 16 extravehicular activity in 1972, which was the United States' fifth and penultimate moon landing

The Lunar Roving Vehicle is driven by astronaut John Young during the first Apollo 16 extravehicular activity in 1972, which was the United States' fifth and penultimate moon landing

A total of nine Gemini missions in just 20 months saw the Americans become the overwhelming favourites to reach the moon first, spurred on by the immortal words of John F Kennedy's famous speech at Rice University from 1962 still ringing in their ears. 

Spurred on by then senator Lyndon B Johnson, who said the Soviet dominance thus far in the space race was unacceptable and that 'control of space means control of the world', JFK issued a challenge to the nation. 

The pledge and the speech itself would be heard and answered by 400,000 Americans who combined to enable the success of Apollo 11. 

The president, who died just over a year after he delivered the rousing oration, proclaimed: 'We choose to go to the Moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard; because that goal will serve to organise and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one we intend to win.'

The surface of the moon as seen from the Apollo 11 shuttle while in lunar orbit.  The 1969 Apollo 11 voyage was the first time man walked on the moon

The surface of the moon as seen from the Apollo 11 shuttle while in lunar orbit.  The 1969 Apollo 11 voyage was the first time man walked on the moon

Astronaut David Scott salutes next to the American flag during the Apollo 15 mission, the fourth United States mission to the moon

Astronaut David Scott salutes next to the American flag during the Apollo 15 mission, the fourth United States mission to the moon 

Astronaut Alan L  Bean, lunar module pilot, is photographed at quadrant II of the Lunar Module during the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity on the moon

Astronaut Alan L  Bean, lunar module pilot, is photographed at quadrant II of the Lunar Module during the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity on the moon

WHAT DID ASTRONAUTS EAT ON THE MOON? 

Apollo 11 astronauts were able to feast on a far wider range of meals than their predecessors.

Development in the storage and treatment of the food meant more food could be taken to space. 

The key breakthrough came in the form of using plastic bags made with a laminated film to remove any chance of a reaction.

Meals on board Eagle, the lunar lander, and Columbia, the command module, included pineapple bars, tuna salad and even cornflakes with powered milk. 

Some meals, such as chicken stew, required rehydrating and were fitted with a nozzle to allow cold or hot water to be inserted.

This all contributed to the three daily meals which took their calorie count to 2,800.

Favourite meals of the moonwalkers were spaghetti with meat sauce, scalloped potatoes and fruitcake cubes for Armstrong while Aldrin opted for shrimp.

They also had access to coffee, with 15 cups allocated to each man for the eight-day trip. 

And the space agency honoured the president posthumously by achieving his goal and sticking to his established timeline - beating it by three years when three Apollo astronauts took off from Cape Canaveral on July 16 1969 and landed on the lunar surface four days later. 

Three men were strapped on top of a Saturn V rocket which took off at 9:30am local time and their journey would last eight days before they splashed down back on Earth. 

In the intervening days they accomplished something no human had ever done before and brought back with them chunks of the moon from around 238,855 miles (384,400 km) away. 

Neil Armstrong was forced to manually land on the moon after the pre-determined area was littered with boulders which made it impossible. 

A manual landing saw him almost deplete his fuel reserves before touching down at the Sea of Tranquillity - and uttering yet another famous phrase: 'The eagle has landed'.

Confirmation of the mission's success was met with rapturous applause around the world as billions held their collective breath. 

None were more relived than those working at NASA headquarters however, who were responsible for building, guiding and assisting the astronauts on their pioneering mission.  

Alan Shepard became the first American in space on May 1961 launch when the rocket Freedom 7 blasted into orbit from Florida

Alan Shepard became the first American in space on May 1961 launch when the rocket Freedom 7 blasted into orbit from Florida

Spectators watch the launch of the Apollo 16 where John Young and Charles Duke were the next men to walk on the moon. When the crew reached lunar orbit, the mission almost had to be aborted because of a problem with Command/Service Module’s main engine.

Spectators watch the launch of the Apollo 16 where John Young and Charles Duke were the next men to walk on the moon. When the crew reached lunar orbit, the mission almost had to be aborted because of a problem with Command/Service Module’s main engine.

Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, mission commander, walks toward the Lunar Roving Vehicle during extravehicular activity at the Taurus-Littrow landing site of NASA's sixth and final Apollo lunar landing mission

Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, mission commander, walks toward the Lunar Roving Vehicle during extravehicular activity at the Taurus-Littrow landing site of NASA's sixth and final Apollo lunar landing mission

Neil Armstrong inside Lunar Module on Apollo 11. His quote 'one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind' became arguably one of the most iconic phrases of the 21st century and the words reverberated around the planet after the Apollo 11 astronauts touched down safely in the 'Eagle' lander

Neil Armstrong inside Lunar Module on Apollo 11. His quote 'one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind' became arguably one of the most iconic phrases of the 21st century and the words reverberated around the planet after the Apollo 11 astronauts touched down safely in the 'Eagle' lander

View of Mission Control during Apollo 11 moonwalk. Not only did the US succeed in beating arch-rivals the USSR to the moon but the space race of the 60s would lay the foundations for a half century of innovation and breakthroughs in a plethora of field

View of Mission Control during Apollo 11 moonwalk. Not only did the US succeed in beating arch-rivals the USSR to the moon but the space race of the 60s would lay the foundations for a half century of innovation and breakthroughs in a plethora of field

Manned Operations Control Room at the conclusion of Apollo 11. Experiments found the moon devoid of any harmful life and the Apollo 11 heroes eventually free to start a tour of celebration around the US and then the rest of the world

 Manned Operations Control Room at the conclusion of Apollo 11. Experiments found the moon devoid of any harmful life and the Apollo 11 heroes eventually free to start a tour of celebration

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