Elaborate grave of a real-life Asterix 'mystery' warrior

Elaborate grave of a real-life Asterix warrior found in Sussex belongs to a French refugee who fled the Roman Army of Julius Caesar in 50BC Highly-elaborate grave of a real-life Asterix resistance fighter has been found  The Iron Age warrior was buried with his glamorous and ornate head-dress Archaeologists believe the person may have been a refugee French Gallic fighter Due to the richness of the finds within the grave, we believe that the mystery warrior held one of the most prestigious roles in the country

By Victoria Bell For Mailonline

Published: 17:23 BST, 22 July 2019 | Updated: 08:06 BST, 23 July 2019

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A highly-elaborate grave of what could have been a real-life Asterix fighter has been discovered on a West Sussex building site.

The warrior was buried with an ornate head-dress, along with a sword and helmet, indicating that he once held 'one of the most prestigious roles in the country'.

Archaeologists believe he may have been a refugee French Gallic fighter who fled Julius Caesar's Roman army as they swept across continental Europe in about 50BC. 

Asterix is a fictional character in the French comic book series of the same name which portrays him as a diminutive but fearless Gaulish warrior living in the time of the Gallic Wars in Britain.

The team described the find, which will go on display at the Chichester Museum in 2020, as 'the most elaborately equipped warrior grave ever found in England'.

Part of the headdress from the helmet belonging to a real-life Asterix resistance fighter against the Romans that has been discovered on a West Sussex building site. The discovery will go on display at Chichester's Novium Museum in January 2020

Part of the headdress from the helmet belonging to a real-life Asterix resistance fighter against the Romans that has been discovered on a West Sussex building site. The discovery will go on display at Chichester's Novium Museum in January 2020

WHAT IS ASTERIX? 

Asterix is a fictional character in the French comic book series Asterix which portrays him as a diminutive but fearless Gaulish warrior living in the time of the Gallic Wars in Britain.  

It was first published in 1959 in Pilote magazine. 

It tells the tale of how he lives in a Brittany village where all inhabitants are made invincible by a magic potion created periodically by a druid.

A Roman invader tying to find the secret is found out when his fake moustache falls off. 

He then finds the magic potion. 

Asterix learns of the druid's capture and then infiltrates the Roman camp.  

He demands strawberries to demand time, consumed them all and gives them the recipe to accelerate the growth of beards and hair. 

The Roman rebels are defeated and Julius Ceasar learns of their intentions to overthrow him. 

He frees Asterix and punishes his own defectors.  

The grave was found during excavations ahead of a Berkeley Homes housing development in North Bersted in 2008.

But it has taken years of conservation and scientific analysis to prepare the artefacts for display.

'It really is absolutely a unique find in the British Isles and in the wider continent,' said Dr Melanie Giles, senior lecturer in archaeology at the University of Manchester.

'We don't have another burial that combines this quality of weaponry and Celtic art with a date that puts it around the time of Caesar's attempted conquest of Britain.

'We will probably never know his name, what we know from the archaeology is that he is either someone from eastern England who may have gone and fought with the Gauls, which we know were a problem for Caesar, as they were allies with the French, helping them with their struggle against him.

Dr Giles also said he might be a Frenchman who flees that conflict, possibly a real-life Asterix and lending aid in terms of the knowledge he has about strategy and  tactics. 

'Also he brings with him

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