Rock samples in Mexico confirm what happened the day the dinosaurs died

sonos sonos One (Gen 2) - Voice Controlled Smart Speaker with Amazon Alexa Built-in - Black read more

() The world was almost destroyed by wildfires, tsunamis and huge clouds of sulphur the day after the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs hit, according to research.

New samples of the rock inside the underwater crater left by the impact have confirmed scientists' theories about what happened that day, they say.

Around 75 per cent of all life on Earth was wiped out by the devastating impact, which hit with the force of 10billion nuclear bombs.

Discoveries of charcoal, lumps of rock and sulphur-rich stones in the seabed in the Yucatan area of Mexico have provided more detail than ever before.

The asteroid which wiped out the dinosaurs (illustrated) is believed to have been between six and 10 miles wide (10-15km) and travelling at a speed of around 44,000 miles per hour (70,000kmh)

The asteroid which wiped out the dinosaurs (illustrated) is believed to have been between six and 10 miles wide (10-15km) and travelling at a speed of around 44,000 miles per hour (70,000kmh)

Researchers from the University of Texas sampled earth in the crater where the asteroid hit 66million years ago in what is now Mexico, and found granite, sandstone and limestone rocks as well as charcoal

Researchers from the University of Texas sampled earth in the crater where the asteroid hit 66million years ago in what is now Mexico, and found granite, sandstone and limestone rocks as well as charcoal

Researchers from the University of Texas have drilled almost a mile into the earth to refine the timeline of what happened some 66million years ago.

'It's an expanded record of events that we were able to recover from within ground zero,' said Professor Sean Gulick, the project leader.

'They are all part of a rock record that offers the most detailed look yet into the aftermath of the catastrophe that ended the Age of Dinosaurs.'

Professor Gulick and Professor Joanna Morgan, from Imperial College London, retrieved cores from 4,265 feet (1,300m) below the submerged 'Chicxulub' crater.

Lying 24 miles off the Yucatan Peninsula's port in Mexico, it is more than 115 miles (185km) wide and 20 miles (32km) deep. Half is underwater and the rest covered by rain forest.

The team conducted their work aboard a boat that was converted into a 40 foot (12m) high drilling station standing on three pillar-like legs.

As they dug into the crust they pulled up cylindrical samples.

What they found were samples of rock which, because they had been forced into the ground at such a fast pace, could indicate a minute-by-minute breakdown of events.

They found melted and broken rocks including sandstone, limestone and granite.

The fateful asteroid is believed to have been between 6.2miles and 9.3mi wide (10km-15km) and hit Earth at a speed of around 44,000 miles per hour (70,000kmh).

According to Professor Gulick's team, the earth-shattering impact triggered a widespread inferno.

It set fire to trees thousands of

read more from dailymail.....

Get the latest news delivered to your inbox

Follow us on social media networks

PREV Astronauts make cement in space for the first time raising hopes for ...
NEXT Birds form language 'like humans' by stringing nonsense sounds together