Honey bees remember good and bad experiences using distinct areas of their ...

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() Ha-bee memories! Honey bees remember good and bad experiences using distinct areas of their brains, study finds Researchers exposed honey bees to either positive or negative experiences These included nursing a queen larvae and fighting off an intruder bee  The bees brains were then extracted to see where these memories were stored  Both memories ended up in the so-called 'mushroom bodies' of the insect brain  However they were remembered in different areas if good or bad, like in humans

By Ian Randall For Mailonline

Published: 17:44 BST, 11 September 2019 | Updated: 17:53 BST, 11 September 2019

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Honey bees retain memories of good and bad social encounters, storing them in distinct clusters in their brains just like we do, researchers have found.

Researchers analysed bee brains after exposing them to either positive or negative experiences — nursing a larvae or fighting off an intruder.

They found that these memories are stored in different areas of the so-called 'mushroom bodies', which are regions of neurons unique to the insect brain.

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Honey bees retain memories of good and bad social encounters, storing them in distinct clusters in their brains just like we do, researchers have found

Honey bees retain memories of good and bad social encounters, storing them in distinct clusters in their brains just like we do, researchers have found

WHAT ARE THE MUSHROOM BODIES? 

Mushroom bodies, seen here in a fly

Mushroom bodies, seen here in a fly

Mushroom bodies are structures that are unique to the brains of insects, arthropods and some worms.

They appear in pairs and are made up of neurons. 

Mushroom bodies have been associated with various neural functions, including learning, memory and sensory integration. 

A new study from the University of Illinois has revealed that good and bad memories of social encounters are stored in different regions within the mushroom body, like in humans.

This separation between positive and negative experiences in the brain may be a fundamental property of animal nervous systems.

Vertebrates and invertebrates — animals with and without backbones — have evolved apart for more than 600 million years.

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