How humans could survive on Mars by eating INSECTS

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How humans could survive on Mars by eating INSECTS: Colonies would need lab-grown meat, tunnel-grown crops and cricket farms, a study finds Resources such as water and oxygen are believed to be in abundant supplies  But lack of a viable food source has long been seen as an insurmountable hurdle  Insect farms are key as they provide calorie-dense meals with little water use

By Jack Elsom For Mailonline

Published: 12:04 BST, 20 September 2019 | Updated: 13:11 BST, 20 September 2019

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The prospect of a human settlement on Mars took a giant leap towards becoming real today as a strategy was developed for surviving on the Red Planet - and it involves eating insects.

Essential resources such as energy, water and oxygen are believed to be in abundant supplies on Mars, but a lack of a viable food source has long been seen as an insurmountable hurdle.

But scientists have now said that the key to thriving on the famously crop-light planet would involve snacking on crickets and growing meat in a laboratory.

Picking up the gauntlet laid down by SpaceX's Elon Musk, planetary scientists at the University of Florida in Orlando devised a plan to sustain a one-million-strong colony.

Essential resources such as energy, water and oxygen are believed to be in abundant supplies on Mars, but a lack of a viable food source has long been seen as an insurmountable hurdle

Essential resources such as energy, water and oxygen are believed to be in abundant supplies on Mars, but a lack of a viable food source has long been seen as an insurmountable hurdle

Keith Cannon, co-lead of the study, told Space.com: 'Food is probably going to be the hardest thing to make locally on Mars, and you can't just import it all if you want

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