Teeth of world's largest prehistoric shark that lived over 2.5 million years ...

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Teeth of world's largest prehistoric shark that lived over 2.5 million years ago found in inland underwater sinkhole in Gulf of Mexico The teeth were found together with other types of fossils in a natural sinkhole Fifteen dental fossils were found, thirteen of which believed to be shark teeth Footage shows the moment Vilichis Zapata finds a tooth and gives the 'okay' sign

By Milly Vincent For Mailonline

Published: 17:06 GMT, 1 November 2019 | Updated: 17:13 GMT, 1 November 2019

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Thirteen shark teeth have been discovered by divers in a inland sinkhole in central Mexico supporting anthropologists' theories that the city of Maderia was once under the sea.

The vibrant capital of the Mexican state of Yucatán has a rich Mayan heritage and a current population of 777,615 however thanks to divers discovery of 2.5 million-year-old shark teeth the theory that it may have once resided underwater now has substantial evidence.

Fifteen dental fossils were found in total with thirteen of them believed to belong to three different species of shark, including a megalodon which existed over 2.5 million years ago. 

Among the fossils were fossilised vertebra that might have belonged to an extinct animal and fossilised human bones, all of them embedded in the walls of a natural sinkhole.

The fossils were found in the Xoc cenote, Xoc meaning Shark in the Mayan language and cenote meaning a natural sinkhole, in the district of Cholul in Merida, the capital of the Mexican state of Yucatan in the Gulf of Mexico. 

Speleologist (scientific study of caves) and photographer Kay Nicte Vilchis Zapata and her partner Erick Sosa Rodriguez, also a speleologist, discovered the fossils while diving in the sinkhole. 

This is the moment two divers find thirteen teeth which are believed to belong to three different species of sharks - including megalodon - which existed over 2.5 million years ago

This is the moment two divers find thirteen teeth which are believed to belong to three different species of sharks - including megalodon - which existed over 2.5 million years ago

The divers also found a fossilised vertebra that might have belonged to an extinct animal and fossilised human bones, all of them embedded in the walls of the sinkhole

The divers also found a fossilised vertebra that might have belonged to an extinct animal and fossilised human bones, all of them embedded in the walls of the sinkhole

Two divers find thirteen teeth which are believed to belong to three different species of sharks including a megalodon which existed over 2.5 million years ago

Two divers find thirteen teeth which are believed to belong to three different species of sharks including a megalodon which existed over 2.5 million years ago

The location of the Cenote Xoch in Merida, Gulf of Mexico, where the 2.5 million-year-old shark teeth were discovered

The location of the Cenote Xoch in Merida, Gulf of Mexico, where the 2.5 million-year-old shark teeth were discovered 

The footage shows the moment Vilichis Zapata finds a tooth and gives the 'okay' sign to show his excitement.

Zapata told local media: 'We were looking at the wall and suddenly I saw a little something, I went closer and I saw that it

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