People are sick of passwords and don't change them enough, new research finds

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Brits are fed up with online passwords with more than three in four hoping they will be replaced with something better in the future, Google study reveals Researchers found that 80 per cent of people felt negatively about passwords People's second biggest annoyance is being locked out of online accounts The biggest annoyance was losing their keys and being locked out of their house More than 40 per cent said they had used the same password for five years 

By Ryan Morrison For Mailonline

Published: 15:03 GMT, 22 November 2019 | Updated: 15:13 GMT, 22 November 2019

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Are you left feeling annoyed when a website says 'please change your password' or 'sorry that password doesn't meet our requirement'? You're not alone, a new Google study found 80 per cent of British people felt negatively about passwords.  

The study found that being locked out of an online account is the second biggest daily frustration for people, just behind losing their keys.

Over three-quarters of British people told researchers they 'hope passwords become outdated in the near future' and are replaced by something easier.

The study found that being locked out of an online account is the second biggest daily frustration for people, just behind losing their keys.  (stock image)

The study found that being locked out of an online account is the second biggest daily frustration for people, just behind losing their keys.  (stock image)

'This frustration can lead to bad password practices like using a weak password or using the same password across different accounts', says Elijah Lawal from Google.

Of the Brits surveyed by Google, a fifth said they haven't thought about their passwords in the last year and 43 per cent admitted to using the same password for more than five years. 

Despite the potential inconvenience, cyber experts recommend keeping a unique password for every account held in order to boost security.

This means that if one account is hacked, criminals will be hindered from gaining access to other information.

Of the Brits surveyed by Google, a fifth said they haven't thought about their passwords in the last year and 43 per cent admitted to using the same password for more than five years. (stock image)

Of the Brits surveyed by Google, a fifth said they haven't thought about their passwords in the last year and 43 per cent admitted to using the same password for more than five years. (stock image)

The Government-backed Get Safe Online service says a safe password can be created by choosing three random

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