Climate-fueled disasters are displacing one person every two SECONDS

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Climate-fueled disasters are forcing 20 million people to flee their homes each year, which is equivalent to one person every two seconds, a new report finds.

The analysis found that floods, cyclones and wildfires are more likely to displace humans than compared to geophysical disasters or conflict.

While no one is immune to a changing word, the report discovered it is poor countries that are most at risk – even though they contribute the least amount to global carbon pollution.

The shocking report was released on Monday by Oxfam International, a charitable organization that focuses on the alleviation of global poverty.

The document, called 'Forced from Home', highlights statistics of climate related weather disaster that are pushing people out of their home, which has increased five-fold over the last decade.

The group is now calling for 'more urgent and ambitious emissions reductions to minimize the impact of the crisis on people's lives, and the establishment of a new 'Loss and Damage' finance facility to help communities recover and rebuild.'

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Climate-fueled disasters are forcing 20 million people to flee their homes each year, which is equivalent to one person every two seconds. The analysis found that floods, cyclones and wildfires are more likely to displace people than by geophysical disasters or conflict

Climate-fueled disasters are forcing 20 million people to flee their homes each year, which is equivalent to one person every two seconds. The analysis found that floods, cyclones and wildfires are more likely to displace people than by geophysical disasters or conflict

The report notes that people are seven more times likely to be displaced by cyclones, floods and wildfires as they are by earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, and three times more likely than by conflict.

Approximately 95 percent of people were forced to move due to tropical cyclones and storms from 2008 through 2018. 

While no one is immune, people in poor countries are most at risk, the report warns,

'People in low and lower-middle income countries such as India, Nigeria and Bolivia are over four times more likely to be displaced by extreme weather disasters than people in rich countries such as the United States,' reads the document.

Approximately 80 percent of Asia's residents have been forced to flee their homes over the last decade – an area home to over a third of the world's poorest individuals. 

On average nearly five percent of the population of Cuba (pictured are people fleeing their homes during Hurricane Irma in 2017), Dominica and Tuvalu, were displaced by extreme weather each year in the decade between 2008 and 2018

On average nearly five percent of the population of Cuba (pictured are people fleeing their homes during Hurricane Irma in 2017), Dominica and Tuvalu, were displaced by extreme weather each year in the decade between 2008 and 2018

The Oxfam analysis shows that economic losses from extreme weather disasters over the last decade were, on average, equivalent to two percent of affected countries' national income

The Oxfam analysis shows that economic losses from extreme weather disasters over the last decade were, on average, equivalent to two percent of affected countries' national income

These numbers are equal to the entire population of Berlin, Hamburg and Munich being displaced within Germany in a single year.

Included in the top 10 countries that face the highest risk of extreme weather events are seven small island developing states – which are known to contribute a very low amount of carbon.

On average nearly five percent of the population of Cuba, Dominica and Tuvalu, were displaced by extreme weather each year in the decade between 2008 and 2018.

This is equivalent to almost half the population of Madrid that is being forced to flee in each year.

These small island communities are 150 times more likely to be displaced by extreme weather disasters than

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