YouTube changes rules on violent game content to match movies and TV

sonos sonos One (Gen 2) - Voice Controlled Smart Speaker with Amazon Alexa Built-in - Black read more

YouTube is making a significant change in how it will moderate content that shows video game violence. Starting today, the company says it will treat "scripted or simulated" violence in games the same way that it approaches violence in TV shows and movies.

According to the company, the change means fewer gaming videos on YouTube will be age-gated, allowing more people to see them. YouTube does, however, note that it plans to continue restricting content where the sole focus of the video is on the violent content itself.

"We know there's a difference between real-world violence and scripted or simulated violence – such as what you see in movies, TV shows, or video games – so we want to make sure we're enforcing our violent or graphic content policies consistently," the company said by way of explanation for the policy change on one of its support pages.

YouTube hinted it was working on a new policy on video game policy late last month when CEO Susan Wojcicki said the company was trying to find companies who would be willing to advertise against more "edgy" content. In that respect, it's worth noting that the company hasn't changed its guidelines on advertiser-friendly content. Videos that show gratuitous amounts of violence will still go largely unmonetized.

sonos sonos One (Gen 2) - Voice Controlled Smart Speaker with Amazon Alexa Built-in - Black read more
In this article: ads, advertising, av, content, creators, entertainment, gaming, google, monetization, videogames, violence, youtube

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Comments

all right reserved for yahoo news

Get the latest news delivered to your inbox

Follow us on social media networks

PREV Omar Hamoui leaves Sequoia for L.A.-based Mucker Capital as it looks to lead more Series A deals
NEXT EU investigates Google data collection practices