Volkswagen 'cheated' emissions standards, High Court hears

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Volkswagen 'cheated' emissions standards designed to 'save lives' by installing unlawful devices in its diesel vehicles, High Court hears The car giant has been accused of fitting devices to cheat clean air laws  Nearly 100,000 VW drivers have filed a High Court claim against the company It's claimed that car pollution kills 23,000 people a year in the UK

By Chantalle Edmunds For Mailonline

Published: 15:25 GMT, 2 December 2019 | Updated: 04:54 GMT, 3 December 2019

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German car giant Volkswagen has been accused of fitting devices to cheat clean air laws as it was claimed car pollution kills 23,000 people a year in the UK.

Nearly 100,000 VW drivers have filed a High Court claim alleging the conglomerate installed a 'defeat device' inside its diesel cars to automatically lower fume emissions.

Tom De La Mare, QC, representing the drivers said: 'The purpose of the prohibition is clear: to prevent cheating of the Emissions Limits by manufacturers.

'In particular, it is designed to prohibit cheating of the New Europran Driving Cycle (NEDC) test, in which manufacturers convey the appearance of compliance with the Emissions Limits by ensuring such limits are met only by a special vehicle configuration used almost exclusively during the test cycle which configuration does not reflect how the vehicle will actually work on the road.'

Nearly 100,000 VW drivers have filed a High Court claim alleging the conglomerate installed a 'defeat device' inside its diesel cars to automatically lower fume emissions

Nearly 100,000 VW drivers have filed a High Court claim alleging the conglomerate installed a 'defeat device' inside its diesel cars to automatically lower fume emissions

Mr De La Mare added: 'Nitrogen dioxide is a gas produced by the combustion of fuel at high temperature in the presence of oxygen.

'Exposure to nitrogen dioxide in the air carries with it significant risks to human health.

'A recent analysis from the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) estimates that exposure to nitrogen dioxide has 'an effect on mortality equivalent to 23,500

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