Nine very rare stone-carved 'figures' found buried under an electrical ...

Archaeologists have unearthed nine ‘very rare’ carved stones from a dig at an electric substation at Finstown, on Orkney, that date back around 4,000 years.

The 'amazing' series of stones — which may have been used to tie off mooring ropes and help secure the roof of a building — stand at up to 20 inches (50 cm) tall.

Researchers from the Orkney Research Centre for Archaeology (ORCA) had to dig through around 24 inches (60 cm) of midden (waste) deposits to expose the stones. 

The archaeologists dubbed the first one to be unearthed the 'Finstown Fella'. 

Scroll down for video

Archaeologists have unearthed nine ‘very rare’ carved stones from a dig at an electric substation at Finstown, on Orkney that date back around 4,000 years ago

Archaeologists have unearthed nine ‘very rare’ carved stones from a dig at an electric substation at Finstown, on Orkney that date back around 4,000 years ago

WHAT ARE THE CARVED STONES? 

The carved stones were found near an electrical substation in Finstown, on Orkney's mainland island.

Nine of the stones have been unearthed, with the largest standing at around 20 inches (50 cm) tall.

Each of appear to have been worked to give them crude shoulders, a neck and what is likely a head.

Experts believe that the stones may have been used to secure mooring ropes that would have helped keep a building's roof secured on.

It is thought that the Finstown stones may date to the Late Neolithic or Early Bronze Age, around 2000 BC. 

Each of the sculptures appear to have been worked to give them crude shoulders, a neck and what is likely a head.

They were found scattered around a hearth within the remains of structure that contained three cists — small stone-built coffin-like boxes — two hearths and a partial ring of holes packed with broken-off upstanding stones.

Three of the roughly carved figures were found incorporated within either the structure of one of the hearths or the foundations of one of the standing stones.

It is believed that the stones may have been used to secure mooring ropes that would have helped keep the building's roof on.

The purpose of the building and how it was used by its inhabitants, however, remains a mystery.

Dating the necked stones will also require further investigative work, as similar objects have also been found from Iron Age sites in Orkney.

Yet from the initial evidence, experts believe that the ones from Finstown may date to the Late Neolithic or Early Bronze Age, at around 2000 BC.

Experts are trying to confirm the purpose of these stones — and if they are indeed figurines — by examining them for abrasion, wear and other such marks.

The 'amazing' series of stones — which may have been used to tie off mooring ropes and help secure the roof of a building — stand at up to 20 inches (50 cm) tall

The 'amazing' series of stones — which may have been used to tie off mooring ropes and help secure the roof of a building — stand at up to 20 inches (50 cm) tall

'This is a significant discovery in

read more from dailymail.....

Get the latest news delivered to your inbox

Follow us on social media networks

NEXT Tax prep companies can’t hide their free filing software from Google anymore