SpaceX forced to CANCEL the launch of 60 Starlink satellites

SpaceX has been forced to delay today's launch of another 60 Starlink satellites into orbit. 

The cluster of satellites was set to be launched at 9:49 ET (14:49 GMT) from Cape Canaveral but SpaceX announced via Twitter it was standing down. 

'Strong upper level winds' were cited as the reason for the cancellation and it is now scheduled for launch tomorrow at 9:28 am EST (14:28 GMT).

Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX, wants to send thousands of satellites into space to beam internet down to all of Earth's inhabitants. 

The minor setback will not deter SpaceX as it presses on with its controversial mission to beam down internet for all via an interconnected satellite constellation. 

Skygazers have repeatedly bemoaned the shiny spacecraft, claiming the shiny spacecraft interfere with their view of the cosmos.  

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SpaceX has been forced to delay today's launch of another 60 Starlink satellites into orbit. The cluster of satellites was set to be launched at 9:49 ET (14:49 GMT) from Cape Canaveral

 SpaceX has been forced to delay today's launch of another 60 Starlink satellites into orbit. The cluster of satellites was set to be launched at 9:49 ET (14:49 GMT) from Cape Canaveral

'Strong upper level winds' were cited as the reason for the cancellation and it is now scheduled for launch tomorrow at 9:28 am EST (14:28 GMT)

 'Strong upper level winds' were cited as the reason for the cancellation and it is now scheduled for launch tomorrow at 9:28 am EST (14:28 GMT)

'Starlink will provide fast, reliable internet to locations where access has been unreliable, expensive, or completely unavailable,' the company writes in its Starlink mission description. 

The satellites are designed to provide broadband coverage across the world's surface.

Today's cancelled launch would have been the third operational batch of Starlink's budding constellation.  

Instead, the 229-foot-tall Falcon 9 rocket will now launch from Cape Canaveral tomorrow. 

Each spacecraft weighs just 575lbs (260kg) and will form part of the larger Starlink constellation. 

Satellites will eventually orbit 341 miles above Earth and the main rocket will land on the 'Of Course I Still Love You' droneship in the Atlantic Ocean. 

Approximately 45 minutes after liftoff, SpaceX's two fairing recovery vessels, 'Ms. Tree' and 'Ms. Chief,' will attempt to recover the two nosecone pieces.

According to weather forecasts, there was an approximate 50 per cent chance of today's launch going ahead.  

The forecast for tomorrow looks clearer, with around 80 per cent chance of suitable weather conditions.  

The minor setback will not deter SpaceX as it presses on with its controversial mission to beam down internet for all via an interconnected satellite constellation. Skygazers have repeatedly bemoaned the shiny spacecraft

 The minor setback will not deter SpaceX as it presses on with its controversial mission to beam down internet for all via an interconnected satellite constellation. Skygazers have repeatedly bemoaned the shiny spacecraft

Dozens of satellites have already been launched and Musk has received clearance from the relevant authorities to send thousands more. 

The previous launch on January 6 featured one satellite covered in a dark coating designed to appease to appease disgruntled astronomers.  

It is hoped the anti-reflective test material will be the first step in a compromise to allow Starlink to thrive while not interfering with views of space from Earth.  

Last month, astronomers called plans for the high-speed global internet a 'tragedy' and said they are getting in the way of key scientific observations.  

'The night sky is a commons — and what we have here is a tragedy of the commons,' Imperial College London astrophysicist Dave Clements told the BBC.

The proposed constellations, he added, 'present a foreground between what we're observing from the Earth and the rest of the Universe. 

'So they get in the way of everything. And you'll miss whatever is behind them, whether that's a nearby potentially hazardous asteroid or the most distant quasar in the Universe.'

The satellites will be a particular menace to large-scale surveys of the sky, like Chile's planned Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST).

'What we want to do with LSST and other telescopes is to make a real-time

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