Asteroid that killed the dinosaurs was 'good for bacteria', study claims 

'Post-apocalyptic microbial mayhem': Asteroid that killed the dinosaurs and nearly wiped out all life on Earth was 'good for bacteria', study claims An asteroid impact 66 million years ago was enough to 'stop photosynthesis' It killed the dinosaurs and wiped out about 75 per cent of all species on Earth Researchers found evidence of bacteria at the impact site soon after it hit 

By Ryan Morrison For Mailonline

Published: 10:33 GMT, 3 February 2020 | Updated: 10:33 GMT, 3 February 2020

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The asteroid that killed the dinosaurs and nearly wiped out all life on Earth was 'good for bacteria', a new study claims.

A team of researchers from Curtin University in Australia studied rocks and soil inside the Chicxulub crater left behind by the dino-killing asteroid.

Remains of plants, fungi and microbes were found in the crater samples - likely transported on waves from a giant tsunami after the impact.

Evidence of blue-green algae was found sitting on top of the dead layer of plans and fungi and it likely formed a few years after the initial crash. 

This shows the resilience of microorganisms to bounce back after 'abnormally hostile conditions', according to lead author Bettina Schaefer.

Researchers say the impact caused a tsunami and put debris into the atmosphere, all within the first day. The tsunami put a bed of plants, fungi and microbes back into the crater that the green-blue algae developed on top of

Researchers say the impact caused a tsunami and put debris into the atmosphere, all within the first day. The tsunami put a bed of plants, fungi and microbes back into the crater that the green-blue algae developed on top of 

The impact of the giant space rock, about 66 million years ago, was intense enough to cause photosynthesis to shut down around the world. 

It moved 24 times faster than a bullet as it hit the Earth and the shockwave that resulted from the impact flattened trees and led to large forest fires. 

Nearly 75 per cent of all species went extinct as a result of the collision. 

At the point of impact, in the middle of the crater, the area was sterile - it was found nearly 20 miles deep in the Gulf of Mexico and not a thing could have survived.  

Before this study scientists had seen hints of early life in the crater, but the numbers were small, meaning a details picture couldn't be captured.  

Ms Schaefer studied the preserved fats left behind by blue-green algae, rather than look for solid fossil records.

The fats were found on top of a layer of fossilised plants washed into the crater by a tsunami but below another layer of debris from the atmosphere. 

The team say this means the bacteria began to populate the crater after the tsunami hit but before the

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