Wooden well uncovered in the Czech Republic is the 'world's oldest manmade ...

Stone Age wooden WELL uncovered in the Czech Republic is the 'world's oldest man-made timber structure' at 7,275 years old The old oak well has been dated to 5255 BC during the early Neolithic period It was found during construction of a motorway near Ostrov, Czech Republic It's also the oldest structure dated using dendrochronology - dating of tree rings The posts of the well show evidence that the skilled carpenters liked to recycle 

By Jonathan Chadwick For Mailonline

Published: 12:24 GMT, 3 February 2020 | Updated: 12:24 GMT, 3 February 2020

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An oak water well uncovered in the Czech Republic is the world’s oldest wooden construction ever discovered.

The well dates to 5,256 or 5,255 BC – the Neolithic period, or the end of the Stone Age – making it 7,275 years old.

The structure has been dated using the internal rings of the wood, which are visible in cross sections.

The sophisticated oak well has a square base area of about 30 inches by 30 inches, and is 4.5 feet in height.

The object is unusual for the Neolithic period and shows that even people in ancient human settlements benefited from skilled carpenters.

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The well is the oldest manmade wooden construction in the world - dating from 5256 or 5255 BC - more than 7,000 years ago

The well is the oldest manmade wooden construction in the world - dating from 5256 or 5255 BC - more than 7,000 years ago

‘The design consists of grooved corner posts with inserted planks,’ said the researchers in their study, published in Journal of Archaeological Science.

‘This type of construction reveals advanced technical know-how and, till now, is the only known type from this region and time period.

‘The shape of the individual structural elements and tool marks preserved on their surface confirm sophisticated carpentry skills.’

The structure was discovered in 2018 during the construction of the D35 motorway near the town of Ostrov, Czech Republic.

The wooden lining of the well was found at a depth of about 5 feet (1.74 metres) below the surface.

Upon its discovery, archaeologists scrambled to set up protective boundaries surrounding the site in case of further discoveries.

However, researchers determined that the well was an isolated construction that served nearby settlements rather than being part of an ancient town.

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