Tumours in fossil dinosaur tail shows it suffered from a painful cancer that ...

Tumours found in 60-million-year-old fossilised dinosaur tail shows the prehistoric reptiles suffered from a painful CANCER that afflicts humans to this day Cavities in the tailbone of the hadrosaur had been formed by tumour growth  The animal is thought to have had 'Langerhans cell histiocytosis', or LCH This rare cancer is known in modern humans and particularly in children It originates in special cells that fight infection but can spread around the body

By Ian Randall For Mailonline

Published: 12:02 GMT, 12 February 2020 | Updated: 12:09 GMT, 12 February 2020

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Tumours found in a 60-million-year-old fossilised dinosaur tail shows that the ancient reptiles suffered from a painful cancer that afflicts humans to this today.

The bones of the hadrosaur — which lived in what is today southern Alberta, Canada — reveal it had a disorder known as 'Langerhans cell histiocytosis', or LCH.

Today, this condition is rare among humans, but is more common in children between the ages of five and 10 years old.

The cancer — which begins in special cells that help fight infection — can lead to tissue damage and lesions across the body, with symptoms varying with location.

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Tumours found in a 60-million-year-old fossilised dinosaur tail (pictured) shows that the ancient reptiles suffered from a painful disease that afflicts humans to this today

Tumours found in a 60-million-year-old fossilised dinosaur tail (pictured) shows that the ancient reptiles suffered from a painful disease that afflicts humans to this today

WHAT IS LCH? 

LCH, of 'Langerhans cell histiocytosis', is a rare type of cancer.

It originates in special cells that help to to fight off infections.

The cells end up growing and multiplying too quickly and they can form lesions and damage tissues across the body. 

The condition is rare among humans, but is more common in children between the ages of 5–10 years old.

It affects around 50 children in the UK each year. 

The dinosaur's disease was identified and described by a team of researchers led by biologist Hila May of the Tel Aviv University.

'[My colleagues] spotted an unusual finding in the vertebrae of a tail of a young dinosaur of the grass-eating herbivore species, common in the

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